Rodchenko

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Rodchenko

(rɒdˈtʃɛŋkəʊ)
n
(Biography) Alexander (Mikhailovich). 1891–1956, Soviet painter, sculptor, designer, and photographer, noted for his abstract geometrical style: a member of the constructivist movement
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The works include canvases by some recognized classical artists like Kazimir Malevich, Wassily Kandinsky, Alexander Rodchenko, Vladimir Tatlin, Alexandra Exter, Marc Chagall, as wel as Victor Bart, Alexei Grischenko, Alexei Morgunov, Sergei Romanovich, Pavel Mansurov and other figures known for their contribution to avant-garde art.
By bringing such internationally significant exhibitions to Qatar, we hope to always provide audiences with access to world-class works and spark creativity for a young generation of artists in Qatar and the region." Visitors to the exhibition will have the opportunity to explore artworks by some of Russia's best-known artists, including avant-garde pioneers such as Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko, Lyubov Popova and Mikhail Matyushin, as well as the "descendants" inspired by their work such as Yuri Zlotnikov, Vyacheslav Koleichuk, Francisco Infante-Arana, Rimma Zanevskaya-Sapgir, and Mikhail Roginsky amongst others.
Visitors to the exhibition will have the opportunity to explore artworks by some of Russia's best-known artists, including avant-garde pioneers such as Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko, Lyubov Popova and Mikhail Matyushin, as well as the 'descendants' inspired by their work such as Yuri Zlotnikov, Vyacheslav Koleichuk, Francisco Infante-Arana, Rimma Zanevskaya-Sapgir and Mikhail Roginsky.
The full colour plates and diagrams enhance the text creating a rich and detailed introduction to The Russian avant-garde of the 1920's and 1930s, featuring figures such as: Mayakovsky, Kandinsky, Malevich, Alexander Rodchenko, Meyerhold and many others.
While the influence and gigantic talent of the post-futurist and non-Jewish Alexander Rodchenko is everywhere and it is gratifying to be able to view the tensile photographs of Georgy Petrusov and Boris Ignatovich with their visual complexities and Hitchkockian angles, the show's focus is diffuse, and I miss the careful historical development the Jewish Museum has come to be known for.
The major figures in each of these movements are included: Benois, but also Bakst, Alexandra Exter, Pavel Filonov, Natalia Goncharova, Konstantin Korovin, Mikhail Larionov, Kazimir Malevich, Liubov Popova, Alexander Rodchenko, and Vladimir Tatlin.
(1) Alexander Lavrentiev, Alexander Rodchenko, Photography 1924-1954 (Konemann, 1996)
Magdalena Dabrowski, Leah Dickerman, and Peter Galassi (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1998), 63-99; and Erika Wolf, "The Visual Economy of Forced Labor: Alexander Rodchenko and the White Sea-Baltic Canal," in Picturing Russia: Explorations in Visual Culture, ed.
The partnership plans to unveil the reinterpreted works of other artists such as Alexander Rodchenko, Anni Albers and Jennifer Bartlett in the coming months.
When Camilla Gray publishes The Great Experiment: Russian Art 1863-1922, exciting interest in the great Bolshevik artists Vladimir Tatlin, Alexander Rodchenko, and their Constructivist, Productivist, and LEF comrades of the early, heroic Soviet years,