Alexander Woollcott


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Noun1.Alexander Woollcott - United States drama critic and journalist (1887-1943)Alexander Woollcott - United States drama critic and journalist (1887-1943)
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By 1928, Warde was living on Crosby Gaige's Watch Hill Farm (an occasional getaway for celebrities like George Gershwin, Harpo Marx, and Alexander Woollcott) and designing books for Watch Hill Press.
He brought in talent from Architect Frank Lloyd Wright to choreographer George Balanchine to humorist Alexander Woollcott to teach and inspire his team.
(Alexander Woollcott, Gertrude Lawrence, Noel Coward.) In the movie, Woolley's "Sheridan Whiteside" just comes off now as evil and childishly, irrationally, mean.
Alexander Woollcott wrote, "Not Tiny Tim, nor Falstaff, nor Rip Van Winkle, nor any other character wrought in the English tongue seems now a more permanent part of that tongue's heritage than do the high-handed Humpty Dumpty, the wistful Mad Hatter, the somewhat arbitrary Queen of Hearts, the evasive Cheshire Cat, and the gently pathetic White Knight." Why, we may ask, does the work of this girl-doting bachelor exert such a powerful hold on our collective imagination?
By the mid-1930s Ten Chimneys (yes you can count them) became a sort of off-season sanctuary for both the Lunts and for luminaries of the theatre world: Alexander Woollcott Laurence Olivier Noel Coward Uta Hagen and Helen Hayes were among the regulars.
In the last years of his life he became an object of cultlike devotion: disciples founded the Fortean Society to propagate Fort's concepts (among the founding members were Dreiser, Ben Hecht, Booth Tarkington, and Alexander Woollcott).
Letters aren't listed separately in an index, not all of them include a dateline, a greeting, or a complimentary closing, nor does the editor preface each letter with the kind of identification given in scholarly editions, such as "Letter from Coward to Alexander Woollcott" (plus the date).
The Algonquin became famous in the 1920s as the meeting place of The Vicious Circle--or Algonquin Round Table--comprising literary worthies such as Dorothy Parker, Alexander Woollcott and Heywood Broun.
This first collection of criticism about Parker's writing includes five new essays, 13 articles printed in journals and books since 1977, a review of Parker's letters to Alexander Woollcott, ("Dear God, please make me stop writing like a woman") and a 1956 interview with the supplicant herself.
Alexander Woollcott in The New Yorker observed that Haldeman-Julius must feel "the crusader's pride" when, in a subway, "he sees a workman settle back on his strap and reach automatically to the pocket where he keeps his Little Blue Book" (1925, 8).
Alongside George Platt Lynes' marvellous but decidedly sombre 1943 portrait of American writer and wit Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), for example, Voss appropriately resurrects Alexander Woollcott's memorable description of the lady as a 'blend of Little Nell and Lady Macbeth' found in the text.
Alexander Woollcott - an annoying critic, author, lecturer and radio personality - visited Hart's farm in Bucks County, Pa., and scribbled in the guest book: "This is to certify that I had one of the most unpleasant evenings I can ever recall having spent."

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