Alexander the Great


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Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great

n
(Biography) 356–323 bc, king of Macedon, who conquered Greece (336), Egypt (331), and the Persian Empire (328), and founded Alexandria

Alexan′der the Great′


n.
356–323 B.C., king of Macedonia 336–323: conqueror of Greek city-states and of the Persian Empire from Asia Minor and Egypt to India.
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Noun1.Alexander the Great - king of MacedonAlexander the Great - king of Macedon; conqueror of Greece and Egypt and Persia; founder of Alexandria (356-323 BC)
Translations
Alexandre le Grand
References in classic literature ?
And the men who commit these crimes, especially their leader, assure themselves that this is admirable, this is glory- it resembles Caesar and Alexander the Great and is therefore good.
Was not a bowl of wine the cause of the demise of Alexander the Great, or, at least, does not Dr.
Second are the romances which, battered salvage from a greater past, retell in strangely altered romantic fashion the great stories of classical antiquity, mainly the achievements of Alexander the Great and the tragic fortunes of Troy.
There is a mythical story of a wonderful speaking-trumpet possessed by Alexander the Great, by which he could call a soldier who was ten miles distant; but there was probably no substitute for the human voice except flags and beacon-fires, or any faster method of travel than the gait of a horse or a camel across ungraded plains.
Spirits in the shapes of ALEXANDER THE GREAT, of his Paramour, of DARIUS, and of HELEN.
Amitay's bibliographical citations are sometimes erratic: Eugene Borza edited and annotated, but did not translate, Ulrich Wilcken's Alexander the Great [New York: Norton, 1967]; George Chatterton Richards published his translation of Wilcken in 1932.
Alexander the Great, ruler of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedonia, led a military campaign throughout the Middle East and parts of Asia.
His triumphant treks across Persian territories made him known as Alexander the Great.
The tomb, measuring 500 meters (a third of a mile) in circumference and dug into a 30-meter (100-foot) high hill in Amphipolis, northern Greece, contains sculptures of sphinxes and caryatids, intricate mosaics and coins featuring the face of Alexander the Great.
it might house the remains of Alexander the Great, whose final
The Alexander The Great Chess Game's proprietary features allow for greater participation by increasing the amount of players that can participate at one time.
Another thesis is that the tomb does hold the bodies of Roxana and her son but not of Alexander the Great.