alexandrine

(redirected from Alexandrine Verse)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Alexandrine Verse: blank verse

al·ex·an·drine

also Al·ex·an·drine  (ăl′ĭg-zăn′drĭn)
n.
1. A line of English verse composed in iambic hexameter, usually with a caesura after the third foot.
2. A line of French verse consisting of 12 syllables with a caesura usually falling after the sixth syllable.
adj.
Characterized by or composed in either of these meters.

[French alexandrin, from Old French, from Alexandre, title of a romance about Alexander the Great that was written in this meter.]

Alexandrine

(ˌælɪɡˈzændraɪn; -drɪn; -ˈzɑːn-) prosody
n
(Poetry) a line of verse having six iambic feet, usually with a caesura after the third foot
adj
(Poetry) of, characterized by, or written in Alexandrines
[C16: from French alexandrin, from Alexandre, title of 15th-century poem written in this metre]

al•ex•an•drine

(ˌæl ɪgˈzæn drɪn, -drin, -ˈzɑn-)

n.
1. (often cap.) a line of poetry in iambic hexameter.
adj.
2. (often cap.) of or pertaining to such a line.
[1580–90; < Middle French alexandrin, after Alexandre, from the use of this meter in an Old French poem on Alexander the Great]

Alexandrine

an iambic hexameter, or iambic verse with six feet.
See also: Verse

alexandrine

A line of verse in iambic hexameter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Alexandrine - (prosody) a line of verse that has six iambic feet
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
line of poetry, line of verse - a single line of words in a poem
Translations

alexandrine

[ˌælɪgˈzændraɪn] Nalejandrino m

alexandrine

nAlexandriner m
adjalexandrinisch
References in classic literature ?
One must eat every day, and the finest Alexandrine verses are not worth a bit of Brie cheese.
Pierre de Ronsard (1 524-1 585) was the most prominent of the circle of French poets known as La Pleiade, and is credited for popularizing the alexandrine verse line.
In the end, Martello concluded that Racine's meter effectively emasculates the gravitas required of a tragedy, and the awkward Alexandrine verse used by the French could not support the majesty and frankness demanded by the emotions.