Algiers


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Al·giers

 (ăl-jîrz′)
The capital and largest city of Algeria, in the northern part of the country on the Mediterranean Sea. An ancient North African port, Algiers was captured by French forces in 1830 and was later a pivotal center of the struggle for Algerian independence.

Algiers

(ælˈdʒɪəz)
n
(Placename) the capital of Algeria, an ancient port on the Mediterranean; until 1830 a centre of piracy. Pop: 3 260 000 (2005 est). Arabic name: Al-Jezair French name: Alger

Al•giers

(ælˈdʒɪərz)

n.
1. the capital of Algeria, in the N part. 1,839,000.
2. one of the former Barbary States: now Algeria.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Algiers - an ancient port on the MediterraneanAlgiers - an ancient port on the Mediterranean; the capital and largest city of Algeria
Algeria, Algerie, Democratic and Popular Republic of Algeria - a republic in northwestern Africa on the Mediterranean Sea with a population that is predominantly Sunni Muslim; colonized by France in the 19th century but gained autonomy in the early 1960s
Translations
Алжир
Alžír
Algier
Alger
Alžir
Algír
Algiers
Algeria
Alžyras
Algier
Alger
Alžír
Alger

Algiers

[ælˈdʒɪəz] NArgel m

Algiers

[ælˈdʒɪərz] nAlger

Algiers

nAlgier nt

Algiers

[ælˈdʒɪəz] nAlgeri fsg
References in classic literature ?
The post-mark (Algiers) had aroused my interest and curiosity, es-pecially at this time, since it was Algiers that was presently to witness the termination of my coming sea voyage in search of sport and adventure.
Gringoire had succeeded in learning that, while a mere child, she had traversed Spain and Catalonia, even to Sicily; he believed that she had even been taken by the caravan of Zingari, of which she formed a part, to the kingdom of Algiers, a country situated in Achaia, which country adjoins, on one side Albania and Greece; on the other, the Sicilian Sea, which is the road to Constantinople.
The next morning Tarzan rode north on his way to Bouira and Algiers.
For being at Tranque, years ago, when attached to the trading-ship Dey of Algiers, I was invited to spend part of the Arsacidean holidays with the lord of Tranque, at his retired palm villa at Pupella; a sea-side glen not very far distant from what our sailors called Bamboo-Town, his capital.
My father must have told us that night about Cervantes as well as about his 'Don Quixote', for I seem to have known from the beginning that he was once a slave in Algiers, and that he had lost a hand in battle, and I loved him with a sort of personal affection, as if he were still living and he could somehow return my love.
Far away, in late spring, "by the sea in the south," the swallows are still lingering around "white Algiers.
Morison to write a letter to the British consul at Algiers, dictating the exact phraseology of it with a fluency that indicated to his captive that this was not the first time the old rascal had had occasion to negotiate with English relatives for the ransom of a kinsman.
A regiment of brown and battered soldiers had arrived home from Algiers, and I judged they got thirsty on the way.
A soldier of the Legion lay dying in Algiers, There was lack of woman's nursing, there was dearth of woman's tears.
There has been no opportunity for that," replied the captive, "since she left Algiers, her native country and home; and up to the present she has not found herself in any such imminent danger of death as to make it necessary to baptise her before she has been instructed in all the ceremonies our holy mother Church ordains; but, please God, ere long she shall be baptised with the solemnity befitting her which is higher than her dress or mine indicates.
de Beaufort is, at this moment, embarking for Algiers.
Ah,' continued my father, still frowning, `their idolized emperor treated these madmen as they deserved; he called them `food for powder,' which was precisely all they were good for; and I am delighted to see that the present government have adopted this salutary principle with all its pristine vigor; if Algiers were good for nothing but to furnish the means of carrying so admirable an idea into practice, it would be an acquisition well worthy of struggling to obtain.