Algonquian


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Related to Algonquian: Algonquian language

Al·gon·qui·an

 (ăl-gŏng′kwē-ən, -kē-ən) also Al·gon·ki·an (-kē-ən)
n. pl. Algonquian or Al·gon·qui·ans also Algonkian or Al·gon·ki·ans
1. A family of North American Indian languages spoken or formerly spoken in an area from Labrador to the Carolinas between the Atlantic coast and the Rocky Mountains.
2. A member of a people traditionally speaking an Algonquian language.

[From Algonquin.]

Al·gon′qui·an adj.

Algonquian

(ælˈɡɒŋkɪən; -kwɪ-) or

Algonkian

npl -ans or -an
1. (Languages) a family of North American Indian languages whose speakers ranged over an area stretching from the Atlantic between Newfoundland and Delaware to the Rocky Mountains, including Micmac, Mahican, Ojibwa, Fox, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, and Shawnee. Some linguists relate it to Muskogean in a Macro-Algonquian phylum
2. (Peoples) a member of any of the North American Indian peoples that speak one of these languages
adj
3. (Languages) denoting, belonging to, or relating to this linguistic family or its speakers
4. (Peoples) denoting, belonging to, or relating to this linguistic family or its speakers

Al•gon•qui•an

(ælˈgɒŋ ki ən, -kwi ən)

also Al•gon•ki•an

(-ki ən)

n.
1. a family of American Indian languages spoken by nearly all the peoples of NE North America except the Iroquoians, from Labrador S to North Carolina and W to Saskatchewan and the Mississippi River, and by several Plains Indian peoples, as the Arapaho, Cheyenne, and Blackfoot.
2. a member of an Algonquian-speaking people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Algonquian - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
Abenaki, Abnaki - a member of the Algonquian people of Maine and southern Quebec
Algonkian, Algonkin - a member of a North American Indian people in the Ottawa river valley of Ontario and Quebec
Arapaho, Arapahoe - a member of a tribe of Plains Indians formerly inhabiting eastern Colorado and Wyoming (now living in Oklahoma and Wyoming)
Blackfoot - a member of a warlike group of Algonquians living in the northwestern plains
Cheyenne - a member of a North American Indian people living on the western plains (now living in Oklahoma and Montana)
Conoy - a member of an Algonquian people formerly living in Maryland between Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac river; allies of the Nanticoke people
Cree - a member of an Algonquian people living in central Canada
Delaware - a member of an Algonquian people formerly living in New Jersey and New York and parts of Delaware and Pennsylvania
Fox - a member of an Algonquian people formerly living west of Lake Michigan along the Fox River
Illinois - a member of the Algonquian people formerly of Illinois and regions to the west
Kickapoo - a member of the Algonquian people formerly inhabiting southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois
Malecite - a member of the Algonquian people of northeastern Maine and New Brunswick
Massachuset, Massachusetts - a member of the Algonquian people who formerly lived around Massachusetts Bay
Menominee, Menomini - a member of the federally recognized tribe of Algonquian people living on a reservation in central Wisconsin
Miami - a member of the extinct Algonquian people formerly living in northern Indiana and southern Michigan
Micmac, Mikmaq - a member of the Algonquian people inhabiting the Maritime Provinces of Canada
Mahican, Mohican - a member of the Algonquian people formerly living in the Hudson valley and eastward to the Housatonic
Nanticoke - a member of the Algonquian people formerly of Maryland and eastern Delaware
Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake Superior
Ottawa - a member of the Algonquian people of southern Ontario
Pamlico - a member of the Algonquian people formerly of the Pamlico river valley in North Carolina
Passamaquody - a member of the Algonquian people related to the Malecite and living in northeastern Maine and New Brunswick
Penobscot - a member of the Algonquian people belonging to the Abnaki confederacy and living in the Penobscot valley in northern Maine
Potawatomi - a member of the Algonquian people originally of Michigan and Wisconsin
Powhatan - a member of the Algonquian people who formerly lived in eastern Virginia
Sauk, Sac - a member of the Algonquian people formerly living in Wisconsin in the Fox River valley and on the shores of Green Bay
Shawnee - a member of the Algonquian people formerly living along the Tennessee river
Wampanoag - a member of the Algonquian people of Rhode Island and Massachusetts who greeted the Pilgrims
2.Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Abnaki - the Algonquian language spoken by the Abnaki and Penobscot
Algonkian, Algonkin - the Algonquian language spoken by the Algonkian
Arapaho, Arapahoe - the Algonquian language spoken by the Arapaho
Blackfoot - any of the Algonquian languages spoken by the Blackfoot
Cheyenne - the Algonquian language spoken by the Cheyenne
Cree - the Algonquian language spoken by the Cree
Delaware - the Algonquian language spoken by the Delaware
Fox - the Algonquian language of the Fox
Illinois - the Algonquian language of the Illinois and Miami
Kickapoo - the Algonquian language of the Kickapoo
Maleseet, Malecite - the Algonquian language of the Malecite and Passamaquody
Massachuset, Massachusetts - the Algonquian language of the Massachuset
Menominee, Menomini - the Algonquian language spoken by the Menomini
Micmac - the Algonquian language of the Micmac
Mahican, Mohican - the Algonquian language spoken by the Mohican
Nanticoke - the Algonquian language spoken by the Nanticoke and Conoy
Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway - the Algonquian language spoken by the Ojibwa
Pamlico - the Algonquian language of the Pamlico
Potawatomi - the Algonquian language spoken by the Potawatomi
Powhatan - the Algonquian language of the Powhatan
Shawnee - the Algonquian language spoken by the Shawnee
Adj.1.Algonquian - of or relating to an Algonquian tribe or its people or language
References in periodicals archive ?
The name of Patchogue is from the Algonquian language meaning "a turning place" or "where two streams separate." Native-Americans had established trails, trade networks, agricultural areas, and culture.
Mzhigenak, in Potawatomi, or mzhigeneng, in Odawa--both of the Algonquian language--mean "the place that has been clear-cut." That jarring place-name refers to Michigan's changing landscape in the early years of the United States, as large amounts of clearcutting for farming and development were underway.
Return to a Native Place: Algonquian Peoples of the Chesapeake
After nearly a decade of excavations, they found not only evidence of contact between the Powhatan Indians and the English colonists but artifacts suggesting that Werowocomoco, which translates from Virginia Algonquian language to "a place of leadership," had been a significant spiritual and political place for four centuries before that.
In certain languages (e.g., Algonquian: Cree [Dahlstrom 1986; Wolfart 1973], Blackfoot [Pustet 1995], Ojibwa [Rhodes 1990; Jelinek 1990], Athabaskan: Navajo [Young and Morgan 1980; Hale 1973], TibetoBurman: Jinghpaw [DeLancey 1981b], Nootkan [Whistler 1985]; Otomanguean: Sochiapan Chinantec [Foris 1993]; see Klaiman 1991 and Givon 1994 for more references) (a subset of) transitive/ditransitive verbs have two forms called DIRECT and INVERSE.
In the first section, for example, scene-setting essays by James Horn, Alden Vaughan, Lisa Blansett, and Emily Rose examine initial encounters in the Chesapeake and look "inward" to Algonquian and English perceptions of each other and their own ambitions.
They spoke English, a relatively new and remarkably pliant language that would easily absorb bits of Spanish, French and Algonquian. Despite their rocky start, these fortune-minded adventurers would be models of entrepreneurial thinking for generations to come.
The settlers overcame a number of difficulties in establishing the colony, including famines and fighting with the local native population, known as the Algonquian tribe.
Montreal author Howard Richler visits them all in Global Mother Tongue: The Eight Flavours of English, among them Portuguese (which gave us flamingo and molasses), Turkish (coffee, shish kebab), Hindi (juggernaut, guru) and Algonquian (moose and, from the Abenaki in Quebec, skunk).
THESE PEOPLES INCLUDED THE INUIT AND THEIR ANCESTORS, AS WELL AS THE ATHAPASKAN (DENE) AND ALGONQUIAN.
Narrator C: Smith repeats the words in the Algonquian [al-GAHN-kwee-un] language.