Algonquian

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Related to Algonquians: Iroquois, Algonquins

Al·gon·qui·an

 (ăl-gŏng′kwē-ən, -kē-ən) also Al·gon·ki·an (-kē-ən)
n. pl. Algonquian or Al·gon·qui·ans also Algonkian or Al·gon·ki·ans
1. A family of North American Indian languages spoken or formerly spoken in an area from Labrador to the Carolinas between the Atlantic coast and the Rocky Mountains.
2. A member of a people traditionally speaking an Algonquian language.

[From Algonquin.]

Al·gon′qui·an adj.

Algonquian

(ælˈɡɒŋkɪən; -kwɪ-) or

Algonkian

npl -ans or -an
1. (Languages) a family of North American Indian languages whose speakers ranged over an area stretching from the Atlantic between Newfoundland and Delaware to the Rocky Mountains, including Micmac, Mahican, Ojibwa, Fox, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, and Shawnee. Some linguists relate it to Muskogean in a Macro-Algonquian phylum
2. (Peoples) a member of any of the North American Indian peoples that speak one of these languages
adj
3. (Languages) denoting, belonging to, or relating to this linguistic family or its speakers
4. (Peoples) denoting, belonging to, or relating to this linguistic family or its speakers

Al•gon•qui•an

(ælˈgɒŋ ki ən, -kwi ən)

also Al•gon•ki•an

(-ki ən)

n.
1. a family of American Indian languages spoken by nearly all the peoples of NE North America except the Iroquoians, from Labrador S to North Carolina and W to Saskatchewan and the Mississippi River, and by several Plains Indian peoples, as the Arapaho, Cheyenne, and Blackfoot.
2. a member of an Algonquian-speaking people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Algonquian - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
Abenaki, Abnaki - a member of the Algonquian people of Maine and southern Quebec
Algonkian, Algonkin - a member of a North American Indian people in the Ottawa river valley of Ontario and Quebec
Arapaho, Arapahoe - a member of a tribe of Plains Indians formerly inhabiting eastern Colorado and Wyoming (now living in Oklahoma and Wyoming)
Blackfoot - a member of a warlike group of Algonquians living in the northwestern plains
Cheyenne - a member of a North American Indian people living on the western plains (now living in Oklahoma and Montana)
Conoy - a member of an Algonquian people formerly living in Maryland between Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac river; allies of the Nanticoke people
Cree - a member of an Algonquian people living in central Canada
Delaware - a member of an Algonquian people formerly living in New Jersey and New York and parts of Delaware and Pennsylvania
Fox - a member of an Algonquian people formerly living west of Lake Michigan along the Fox River
Illinois - a member of the Algonquian people formerly of Illinois and regions to the west
Kickapoo - a member of the Algonquian people formerly inhabiting southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois
Malecite - a member of the Algonquian people of northeastern Maine and New Brunswick
Massachuset, Massachusetts - a member of the Algonquian people who formerly lived around Massachusetts Bay
Menominee, Menomini - a member of the federally recognized tribe of Algonquian people living on a reservation in central Wisconsin
Miami - a member of the extinct Algonquian people formerly living in northern Indiana and southern Michigan
Micmac, Mikmaq - a member of the Algonquian people inhabiting the Maritime Provinces of Canada
Mahican, Mohican - a member of the Algonquian people formerly living in the Hudson valley and eastward to the Housatonic
Nanticoke - a member of the Algonquian people formerly of Maryland and eastern Delaware
Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway - a member of an Algonquian people who lived west of Lake Superior
Ottawa - a member of the Algonquian people of southern Ontario
Pamlico - a member of the Algonquian people formerly of the Pamlico river valley in North Carolina
Passamaquody - a member of the Algonquian people related to the Malecite and living in northeastern Maine and New Brunswick
Penobscot - a member of the Algonquian people belonging to the Abnaki confederacy and living in the Penobscot valley in northern Maine
Potawatomi - a member of the Algonquian people originally of Michigan and Wisconsin
Powhatan - a member of the Algonquian people who formerly lived in eastern Virginia
Sauk, Sac - a member of the Algonquian people formerly living in Wisconsin in the Fox River valley and on the shores of Green Bay
Shawnee - a member of the Algonquian people formerly living along the Tennessee river
Wampanoag - a member of the Algonquian people of Rhode Island and Massachusetts who greeted the Pilgrims
2.Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Abnaki - the Algonquian language spoken by the Abnaki and Penobscot
Algonkian, Algonkin - the Algonquian language spoken by the Algonkian
Arapaho, Arapahoe - the Algonquian language spoken by the Arapaho
Blackfoot - any of the Algonquian languages spoken by the Blackfoot
Cheyenne - the Algonquian language spoken by the Cheyenne
Cree - the Algonquian language spoken by the Cree
Delaware - the Algonquian language spoken by the Delaware
Fox - the Algonquian language of the Fox
Illinois - the Algonquian language of the Illinois and Miami
Kickapoo - the Algonquian language of the Kickapoo
Maleseet, Malecite - the Algonquian language of the Malecite and Passamaquody
Massachuset, Massachusetts - the Algonquian language of the Massachuset
Menominee, Menomini - the Algonquian language spoken by the Menomini
Micmac - the Algonquian language of the Micmac
Mahican, Mohican - the Algonquian language spoken by the Mohican
Nanticoke - the Algonquian language spoken by the Nanticoke and Conoy
Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway - the Algonquian language spoken by the Ojibwa
Pamlico - the Algonquian language of the Pamlico
Potawatomi - the Algonquian language spoken by the Potawatomi
Powhatan - the Algonquian language of the Powhatan
Shawnee - the Algonquian language spoken by the Shawnee
Adj.1.Algonquian - of or relating to an Algonquian tribe or its people or language
References in periodicals archive ?
He compares it with that of the Algonquians, the Apaches, the Tlingit natives of the American Northwest, and even Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories.
Though Puritans were ambivalent about when to attribute significance to dreams while Algonquians saw dreams as a place to commune with the spirits and learn truths, both cultures believed important messages could arrive in a dream.
Quakers, Catholics, Algonquians, and Bermudians of color, in various ways, offered "bodily performances [that] created alternate spaces that cut across English puritan definitions of the body of Christ and the body politic" (125).
The first chapter offers an excellent discussion of Central Algonquians and Siouan peoples' practices of enslavement.
Part One: "Captured in Peacetime" looks at the different ways Algonquians, Iroquoians, and Europeans took and treated captives before the Seven Years War.
Despite their many differences in language, culture, and beliefs, English settlers and the Algonquians were able to communicate reciprocally using the symbolic language of food.
For discussions of the significance of wampum among Algonquians and in New England more generally, see Lisa Brooks, The Common Pot: The Recovery of Native Space in the Northeast (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008); Matt Cohen, The Networked Wilderness: Communicating in Early New England (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010); and Germaine Warkentin, "In Search of 'The Word of the Other': Aboriginal Sign Systems and the History of the Book in Canada.
Rather, she represents one in a long line of Indians in general and Virginian Algonquians in particular who "sought cooperation rather than conflict" and "coexistence on shared regional parches of ground rather than arms-length contact across distant frontiers" who but sought to do so on Native terms.
Her people, and related Algonquians northward and across Canada to the Rockies, contributed much to modern English language, cuisine, even politics and constitutions.
He asserted that substantial ethnographic details existed concerning lunar symbolism in the ethnology of the Great Lakes Algonquians, but provided no references for his readers.
Perhaps this is a point of which Hariot was uneasily aware when he wrote his reports about the Algonquians from Virginia.
In particular, Read finds fault with critics' tendency to insist that Smith's descriptions of the Native Algonquians of Virginia are little more than mastering tactics in a larger imperial hegemonic scheme.