Alkoran

Alkoran

(ˌælkɒˈrɑːn) or

Alcoran

n
(Koran) a less common name for the Koran
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References in periodicals archive ?
(28) The deniers and abusers, of course, were non-Christians, as made clear in his Messiiapravdivyi (Judaism), Bogipoganskie (paganism), and Alkoran Magometa (Islam).
1632), for instance, produced an English translation and an index of the Qur'an with the suggestive title Mohammedis imposturm: that is, A discovery of the manifold forgeries, falshoods, and horrible impieties of the blasphemous seducer Mohammed with a demonstration of the insufciencie of his law, contained in the cursed Alkoran; delivered in a conference had betweene two Mohametans, in their retorne from Mecha.
1736) Preliminary Discourse appended to his The Koran: commonly called the Alkoran of Mohammed translated into English from the original Arabic with explanatory notes and commentaries.
As a member of the Ukrainian Orthodox clergy and a celebrated preacher and talented author, Galiatovs'kyi could not and would not avoid issues of faith, particularly while addressing the religious and political issue of the "Muslim threat." (49) Besides the aforementioned criticism by Galiatovs'kyi of Yurii Khmel'nyts'kyi's political agenda, this cleric is more known for his anti-Muslim polemical works, written during the joint Polish-Muscovite campaigns against the Ottomans: Lebid" ("The Swan", 1683) and Alkoran machometow, naukq heretyckq ("Mohamed's Koran as heretical teaching", 1687).
transliterated in various ways--Koran, Qur'an, Alkoran, etc.