alkyne

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al·kyne

 (ăl′kīn′)
n.
Any of a series of aliphatic hydrocarbons with a carbon-carbon triple bond and the general formula CnH2n-2.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

alkyne

(ˈælkaɪn) or

alkine

n
(Elements & Compounds)
a. any unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbon that has a formula of the type CnH2n–2
b. (as modifier): alkyne series.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al•kyne

(ˈæl kaɪn)

n.
any member of the homologous series of unsaturated, aliphatic hydrocarbons having at least one triple bond and the general formula CnH2n−2, as acetylene.
[1880–85; alk (yl) + -ine2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·kyne

(ăl′kīn′)
Any of a group of hydrocarbons whose carbon atoms form chains linked by one or more triple bonds. Alkynes have the general formula CnH2n-2 and include acetylene.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alkyne - a colorless flammable gas used chiefly in welding and in organic synthesisalkyne - a colorless flammable gas used chiefly in welding and in organic synthesis
aliphatic compound - organic compound that is an alkane or alkene or alkyne or their derivative
oxyacetylene - a mixture of oxygen and acetylene; used to create high temperatures for cutting or welding metals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
алкин
alquí
alkyn
Alkin
alkino
alküün
alkyyni
alcyne
אלקין
alkin
alkin
alkuna
アルキン
alkinum
alkīni
alkyn
alkyn
alkin
alcino
alchină
alkín
alkin
алкин
alkyn
алкін

alkyne

[ˈælkaɪn] nalchino
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The peak values indicated the presence of functional groups such as C=C alkenes, C=O group of acids, C=C alkynes, -C-H stretch (alkane H) and O-H (hydrogen bond, intermolecular, polymeric association).
On commercial scale bromocyclopentane is formulated through numerous methods such as free radical halogenation reaction between alkanes & bromine, from alkene & alkynes, nucleophilic substitution of alcohol, and from carboxylic acids.
Thus, it was concluded that there were alkynes and olefins compounds in shale oil.
Microwave-assisted acetylation of terminal alkynes. Benjamin Ide* and Phillip Shelton, The University of Tennessee at Martin, Martin, Tennessee.
It might react with dienes, alkenes and cycloalkenes, with heterocyclic dienophiles like N-methylpyrrole and indole derivatives, with alkynes, enamines and other compounds.
reported a role of in situ click chemistry to explain bio-orthogonal 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azide and alkynes in HIV-1-Pr inhibition [31].
Hanci et al., "Preparation and characterization of 1,2,3-triazole-cured polymers from endcapped azides and alkynes," Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry, vol.
The most common click reaction occurs between copper catalyzed 1,3 dipolar cycloaddition of azides and terminal alkynes known as CuAAC (copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition).
The IR peak at 2092.30 [cm.sup.-1] is due to the alkynes groups present in the lipids and nitrile group (-CN) present in proteins of algae [37].
developed a [sup.18]F labeled bile acid for studying Farnesoid X Receptor-(FXR-) related diseases, using a click reaction of 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of terminal alkynes and organic azides [10].
Dory, "Hydrogen bonds between acidic protons from alkynes (C-H-O) and amides (N-H-O) and carbonyl oxygen atoms as acceptor partners," Journal of Crystallography, vol.
The other types of chemical components included aldehydes, alkynes, and aromatic compounds.