mortality

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mortality

the quality or state of being mortal; death rate; the ratio of deaths in a given area to the population of that area: mortality figures
Not to be confused with:
morality – character or virtue; concern with the distinction between good and evil or right conduct; the right principles of human conduct: morality lessons

mor·tal·i·ty

 (môr-tăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. mor·tal·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being mortal.
2. Mortals considered as a group; the human race.
3. Death, especially of large numbers; heavy loss of life: the mortality wrought by an epidemic.
4. Death rate.
5. The rate of failure or loss: the high mortality among family-run farms.

mortality

(mɔːˈtælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the condition of being mortal
2. (Pathology) great loss of life, as in war or disaster
3. (Pathology) the number of deaths in a given period
4. mankind; humanity
5. an obsolete word for death

mor•tal•i•ty

(mɔrˈtæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or condition of being subject to death.
2. the relative frequency of deaths in a specific population; death rate.
3. mortal beings collectively; humanity.
4. death or destruction on a large scale, as from war, plague, or famine.
5. Obs. death.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mortality - the quality or state of being mortalmortality - the quality or state of being mortal
impermanence, impermanency - the property of not existing for indefinitely long durations
immortality - the quality or state of being immortal
2.mortality - the ratio of deaths in an area to the population of that area; expressed per 1000 per year
infant deathrate, infant mortality, infant mortality rate - the death rate during the first year of life
neonatal mortality, neonatal mortality rate - the death rate during the first 28 days of life
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"

mortality

noun
1. humanity, transience, impermanence, ephemerality, temporality, corporeality, impermanency The event served as a stark reminder of our mortality.
2. death, dying, fatality, loss of life the nation's infant mortality rate
Quotations
"Dust thou art, and unto dust thou shalt return" Bible: Genesis
"Earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust" Book of Common Prayer
"Old mortality, the ruins of forgotten times" [Thomas Browne Hydriotaphia]
"All men think all men mortal but themselves" [Edward Young Night Thoughts]
"Man that is born of a woman is of few days, and full of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower, and is cut down; he fleeth also as a shadow, and continueth not" Bible: Job
Proverbs
"Here today and gone tomorrow"
Translations
عَدَد الوَفياتفَناء، وفاة
smrtelnostúmrtnost
=-dødeligheddødelighed
smrtnost
halálozáshalálozási arányhalandóság
dánartíînidauîleiki
smrteľnosť
dödlighet
ölüm oranıölümlülük

mortality

[mɔːˈtælɪtɪ]
A. N
1. (= condition) → mortalidad f
2. (= fatalities) → mortandad f, número m de víctimas
B. CPD mortality rate Ntasa f de mortalidad
mortality table Ntabla f de mortalidad

mortality

[mɔːrˈtælɪti] nmortalité fmortality rate n(taux m de) mortalité fmortal sin npéché m mortel

mortality

n
(= mortal state)Sterblichkeit f
(= number of deaths)Todesfälle pl; (= rate)Sterblichkeit(sziffer) f, → Mortalität f (form); mortality rate, rate of mortalitySterbeziffer f, → Sterblichkeitsziffer f, → Mortalität f (form)

mortality

[mɔːˈtælɪtɪ] nmortalità f inv

mortal

(ˈmoːtl) adjective
1. liable to die; unable to live for ever. Man is mortal.
2. of or causing death. a mortal illness; mortal enemies (= enemies willing to fight each other till death); mortal combat.
noun
a human being. All mortals must die sometime.
morˈtality (-ˈtӕ-) noun
1. the state of being mortal.
2. (also mortality rate) the number of deaths in proportion to the population; the death rate. infant mortality.
ˈmortally adverb
in such a way as to cause death. He has been mortally wounded.
mortal sin
(especially in Roman Catholicism) a very serious sin, as a result of which the soul is damned for ever.

mor·tal·i·ty

n. mortalidad, mortandad.
1. estado de ser mortal;
2. índice de mortalidad.

mortality

n mortalidad f; infant — mortalidad infantil
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The researchers found that at the end of the study period, 385 patients in the surgical group and 3,243 in the nonsurgical group experienced a primary end point (first occurrence of the composite of all-cause mortality, coronary artery events, cerebrovascular events, heart failure, nephropathy, and atrial fibrillation; cumulative incidence at eight years, 30.8 versus 47.7 percent; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.61).
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The randomized trial, which met its primary non-inferiority endpoint of all-cause mortality or disabling stroke at two years compared to surgery, was presented at the American College of Cardiology 68th Annual Scientific Session and published simultaneously in The New England Journal of Medicine.
The study, which aims to evaluate the association between low-level drinking and mortality, found that the minimum risk of low-level drinking for all-cause mortality is approximately three occasions in a week, limited to 1 to 2 drinks per occasion.
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The all-cause mortality adjusted for age, gender, and a history of substance use disorders or self-harm was 2.17-fold greater in 18- to 29-year-olds who had treatment-resistant depression, compared with those with nonresistant major depressive disorder; 1.51-fold greater in 30- to 49-year-olds with treatment-resistant depression; and 1.18-fold greater in 50- to 69-year-olds with treatment-resistant depression.
Moreover, those baseline hyperlipidemic women who later got breast cancer had a 40% lower risk of all-cause mortality than did matched nonhyperlipidemic controls diagnosed with the malignancy during follow-up, according to Dr.
All-cause mortality. In the overall pooled cohort (EPT and ET groups), all-cause mortality was similar, with a rate of 27.1% in the HT group and 27.6% in the placebo group (HR, 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-1.03).