allegory

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Related to Allegorists: allegory

al·le·go·ry

 (ăl′ĭ-gôr′ē)
n. pl. al·le·go·ries
1.
a. The representation of abstract ideas or principles by characters, figures, or events in narrative, dramatic, or pictorial form.
b. A story, picture, or play employing such representation. John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick are allegories.
2. A symbolic representation: The blindfolded figure with scales is an allegory of justice.

[Middle English allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein, to interpret allegorically : allos, other; see al- in Indo-European roots + agoreuein, to speak publicly (from agorā, marketplace; see ger- in Indo-European roots).]

al′le·go′rist n.

allegory

(ˈælɪɡərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
2. (Art Terms) a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
4. (Art Terms) the technique or genre that this represents
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
6. (Art Terms) use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral
7. anything used as a symbol or emblem
[C14: from Old French allegorie, from Latin allēgoria, from Greek, from allēgorein to speak figuratively, from allos other + agoreuein to make a speech in public, from agora a public gathering]
ˈallegorist n

al•le•go•ry

(ˈæl əˌgɔr i, -ˌgoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the representation of spiritual, moral, or other abstract meanings through the actions of fictional characters that serve as symbols.
2. an allegorical or figurative narrative, poem, or the like: the allegory of Piers Plowman.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin allēgoria < Greek allēgoría, derivative of allēgoreîn to speak so as to imply something other = all- all- + -ēgorein to speak (see category)]

allegory

an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n.allegorical, adj.
See also: Representation
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Art
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
See also: Literature

allegory

A form in which the action and other elements stand for something else in real life.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)allegory - a short moral story (often with animal characters)
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
Aesop's fables - a collection of fables believed to have been written by the Greek storyteller Aesop
2.allegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract ideaallegory - a visible symbol representing an abstract idea
symbolic representation, symbolisation, symbolization, symbol - something visible that by association or convention represents something else that is invisible; "the eagle is a symbol of the United States"
scarlet letter - the letter A in red; Puritans required adulterers to wear it
cupid - a symbol for love in the form of a cherubic naked boy with wings and a bow and arrow
donkey - the symbol of the Democratic Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
dove - an emblem of peace
eagle - an emblem representing power; "the Roman eagle"
elephant - the symbol of the Republican Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874
fasces - bundle of rods containing an axe with the blade protruding; in ancient Rome it was a symbol of a magistrate's power; in modern Italy it is a symbol of fascism
national flag, ensign - an emblem flown as a symbol of nationality
hammer and sickle - the emblem on the flag of the Soviet Union
red flag - the emblem of socialist revolution
Magen David, Mogen David, Shield of David, Solomon's seal, Star of David - a six-pointed star formed from two equilateral triangles; an emblem symbolizing Judaism
badge - an emblem (a small piece of plastic or cloth or metal) that signifies your status (rank or membership or affiliation etc.); "they checked everyone's badge before letting them in"
Agnus Dei, Paschal Lamb - figure of a lamb; emblematic of Christ
maple-leaf - the emblem of Canada
medallion - an emblem indicating that a taxicab is registered
spread eagle - an emblem (an eagle with wings and legs spread) on the obverse of the Great Seal of the United States
Hakenkreuz, swastika - the official emblem of the Nazi Party and the Third Reich; a cross with the arms bent at right angles in a clockwise direction
3.allegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblancesallegory - an expressive style that uses fictional characters and events to describe some subject by suggestive resemblances; an extended metaphor
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"

allegory

noun symbol, story, tale, myth, symbolism, emblem, fable, parable, apologue The book is a kind of allegory of the country's history.
Translations
alegoriejinotaj
allegoriavertauskuva

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] Nalegoría f

allegory

[ˈælɪgəri] nallégorie f
an allegory of sth → une allégorie de qch

allegory

nAllegorie f

allegory

[ˈælɪgərɪ] nallegoria
References in classic literature ?
He is neither a narrator, nor an allegorist. He is a great teacher, a corrector of morals, a censor of vice, and a commender of virtue.
A smaller number of allegorists embrace the idea of a millennium, but they view it as a lengthy period of time (not necessarily a precise thousand years) prior to Christ's return when Christianity is predominant and Christ's spirit, not his personal presence, reigns over the earth.
But artists whose programs are based on strategic accretions of objects of art, science, or natural history more often than not fall under Benjamin's rubric of "allegorists," gatherers who dislodge "things from their context" and rely on their own insights to "illuminate their meaning." "The Artist's Museum" explores such procedures of artistic illumination via thirty-odd works by figures such as Carol Bove, Rachel Harrison, Goshka Macuga, Christian Marclay, Xaviera Simmons, and Sara VanDerBeek; a substantial catalogue with essays by the curator, Claire Bishop, Lynne Cooke, and Ingrid Schaffner accompanies the exhibition.--Jeffrey Kastner
(6) Given the deep preoccupations with family ties and their agonizing aspects in Hawthorne's fiction, and how closely related his work was to that of his fellow allegorists Spenser, Bunyan, and Milton, we might begin to understand influence as a means of simultaneously acknowledging and disavowing propinquity, of merging and separating literary bloodlines.
The allegorists heaped emblematic images one on top of another, as if the sheer quantity of meanings could compensate for their arbitrariness and lack of coherence.
2) who noted, "over a millennium and a half, through changing theological perspectives and hermeneutical approaches, from the pens of ancient Alexandrian allegorists and modern French structuralists' discussion of the shortened ending of the shortest gospel persists." our own reading of the literature suggests that the debate is unlikely to ever end as none of the proposed views are beyond a reasonable doubt.
"this is said allegorically." Since Theodore's Against the Allegorists has been lost, his extended treatment of this verse serves as the best surviving window into his objections to a certain kind of allegorical interpretation of scripture.
The poem ends with the repeated assertion, "They are hiring allegorists again." It is not a minor occupation: Dante was an allegorist, after all.
In his articles about this genre, Pablo Vila ("Rock Nacional, Cronicas De La Resistencia Juvenil; "Rock Nacional and Dictatorship in Argentina; "Argentinas Rock Nacional: The Struggle for Meaning), which analysed the case of rock in this country from a sociological point of view, included some references to lyrics composed by one of its principal musicians and allegorists, Charly Garcia.
She continues the work of complicating the standard picture of Alexandrian allegorists and Antiochene literalists by showing that exegetes of both schools used the agonistic paradigm.
On the one hand, as Rachel Jacoff notes, the medieval allegorists saw Europa as the soul lifted to heaven by Christ, figured as the bull.
This is how War and Peace makes historians allegorists, turns specialists in global studies into dialecticians, and entices literary critics to become historians.