alliteration

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al·lit·er·a·tion

 (ə-lĭt′ə-rā′shən)
n.
The repetition of identical or similar sounds at the beginning of words or in stressed syllables, as in "on scrolls of silver snowy sentences" (Hart Crane). Modern alliteration is predominantly consonantal; certain literary traditions, such as Old English verse, also alliterate using vowel sounds.

[From ad- + Latin littera, letter.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

alliteration

(əˌlɪtəˈreɪʃən)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of the same consonant (consonantal alliteration) or of a vowel, not necessarily the same vowel (vocalic alliteration), at the beginning of each word or each stressed syllable in a line of verse, as in around the rugged rock the ragged rascal ran
[C17: from Medieval Latin alliterātiō (from Latin al- (see ad-) + litera letter), on the model of obliterātiō obliteration]
alˈliterative adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al•lit•er•a•tion

(əˌlɪt əˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. repetition of the same sound, as a consonant or cluster, at the beginning of two or more stressed syllables, as in from stem to stern. Compare consonance (def. 4a).
2. the commencement of two or more words of a word group with the same letter, as in apt alliteration's artful aid.
[1650–60; < Medieval Latin alliterātiō=al- al- + literātiō]
al•lit′er•a`tive (-əˌreɪ tɪv, -ər ə tɪv) adj.
al•lit′er•a`tive•ly, adv.
al•lit′er•a`tive•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

alliteration

the repetition of a sound, especially a consonant, for rhetorical or poetic effect. Also called adnomination, agnomination, annomination. — alliterative, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

alliteration

1. The use of the same consonant at the beginning of several successive words, especially in a line of verse.
2. Use of a sequence of words beginning with the same initial letter.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alliteration - use of the same consonant at the beginning of each stressed syllable in a line of verse; "around the rock the ragged rascal ran"
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
alkusointu
aliteracija

alliteration

[əˌlɪtəˈreɪʃən] Naliteración f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

alliteration

[əˌlɪtəˈreɪʃən] nallitération f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

alliteration

nAlliteration f, → Stabreim m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

alliteration

[əˌlɪtəˈreɪʃn] nallitterazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Anglo-Saxon poetry depended for its pleasantness to the ear, not on rhyme as does ours, but on accent and alliteration. Alliteration means the repeating of a letter.
In translating, of course, the alliteration is very often lost.
Upon these rules of accent and alliteration the strict form of Anglo-Saxon verse was based.
At times, too, Layamon has neither rhyme nor alliteration in his lines, sometimes he has both, so that his poem is a link between the old poetry and the new.
I don't know what this - jolly old - Jaundiced Jail,' Tom had paused to find a sufficiently complimentary and expressive name for the parental roof, and seemed to relieve his mind for a moment by the strong alliteration of this one, 'would be without you.'
"More alliteration. No, I don't want Alec and Alonzo when I have a cold in the head.
On the side of poetical expression such imaginative figures of speech as metaphors and similes, and such devices as alliteration, prove especially helpful.
I could see Macdona among the doctors--"Hope in Harley Street"--Mac had always a weakness for alliteration. "Interview with Mr.
'They bring the body, and we pay the price,' he used to say, dwelling on the alliteration - 'QUID PRO QUO.' And, again, and somewhat profanely, 'Ask no questions,' he would tell his assistants,
The alliteration is good, and there is something in the nomenclature that gives to us as a body the sense of corporate existence: Apprentice, Mate, Master, in the ancient and hon ourable craft of the sea.
Nikita, surnamed Necator, with a sinister aptness of alliteration! Razumov had heard of him.
Three animal friends decide to venture into a creepy, crooked creek (and the alliterations don't end there) full of strange lumpy bridges and scratchy thorns - and realise just in time that all is not as it seems...