allomorph

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al·lo·morph 1

 (ăl′ə-môrf′)
n.

al′lo·mor′phic adj.
al′lo·mor′phism n.

al·lo·morph 2

 (ăl′ə-môrf′)
n.
Any of the variant forms of a morpheme. For example, the phonetic (s) of cats (kăts), (z) of pigs (pĭgz), and (ĭz) horses (hôr′sĭz) are allomorphs of the English plural morpheme.


al′lo·mor′phic adj.
al′lo·mor′phism n.

allomorph

(ˈæləˌmɔːf)
n
1. (Linguistics) linguistics any of the phonological representations of a single morpheme. For example, the final (s) and (z) sounds of bets and beds are allomorphs of the English noun-plural morpheme
2. (Chemistry) any of two or more different crystalline forms of a chemical compound, such as a mineral
ˌalloˈmorphic adj

al•lo•morph

(ˈæl əˌmɔrf)

n.
one of the alternate forms of a morpheme, as the plural form -en in oxen, the -es in stitches, and the vowel in men.
[1865–70]
al`lo•mor′phic, adj.
al′lo•mor•phism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allomorph - any of several different crystalline forms of the same chemical compound; "calcium carbonate occurs in the allomorphs calcite and aragonite"
chemical compound, compound - (chemistry) a substance formed by chemical union of two or more elements or ingredients in definite proportion by weight
2.allomorph - a variant phonological representation of a morpheme; "the final sounds of `bets' and `beds' and `horses' and `oxen' are allomorphs of the English plural morpheme"
morpheme - minimal meaningful language unit; it cannot be divided into smaller meaningful units
morphophoneme - (linguistics) the phonemes (or strings of phonemes) that constitute the various allomorphs of a morpheme
Translations
Allomorph
allomorfi
allomorphe
alomorf
allomorf

allomorph

[ˈæləʊmɔːf] Nalomorfo m
References in periodicals archive ?
There is no language in which the plural does not have some nonzero allomorphs, whereas there are languages in which the singular is expressed only by zero.
Interestingly, Croatian language manuals and research do not agree on whether o--and ob--are allomorphs or two pre fixes.
Let us start by considering the distribution of the allomorphs -er and -aar and see how we account for that distribution in DM.
European scholars discuss semantic and syntactic gradience in auxiliary selection, as well as the limits of the concept of gradience; the evidence for the assumption that ohaveo and obeo in perfect constructions cannot always be considered allomorphs and the implications for the analysis of the historical development of auxiliaries; and mechanisms in the gradual change from obeo to ohave.
For example, in the poem, Mhondoro huru dzeZimbabwe, found in Nduri dzeZimbabwe, he repetitively uses the copulative inflecting affix lndi-1 and its allomorphs in the present continuous tense to communicate the idea that ancestors are perceived in the here and now.
suffix -liq allomorphs -liy; -liq; -luy; -lug; They unite suffix and vowel and consonant changes in harmony with the root word vowel.
This paper effects this by arguing that Parmenides champions a metaphysically refined form of material monism, a type-monism of things; that light and night are allomorphs of what is (to eon); and that the key features of what is are entailed by the theory of material monism.
The marker of the 2P1 imperative -ka/-ga has no harmonic variants (note that one of its allomorphs is homonymous with the comitative marker).
Although the proliferation of allomorphs involves a remarkable increase of redundancy in the mental lexicon, Garrapa believes that this price has to be paid because allomorph selection is synchronically phonologically opaque.
phonetic substance), with the following variant allomorphs [s] and [z] and [ez]; (ii) the morpheme does not constitute a syllable, as it does not have vowels; (iii) it is a sonorous morpheme, but frequently it occurs in complex codas in final position of verbs in combination with other consonant sounds (e.
In general in West Semitic it would appear therefore necessary to posit only -*n, with two conditioned allomorphs, and -nn, with perhaps -nn generalizing in some cases.