allotrope

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al·lo·trope

 (ăl′ə-trōp′)
n.
A structurally differentiated form of an element that exhibits allotropy.

[Back-formation from allotropy.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

allotrope

(ˈæləˌtrəʊp)
n
(Chemistry) any of two or more physical forms in which an element can exist: diamond and graphite are allotropes of carbon.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al•lo•trope

(ˈæl əˌtroʊp)

n.
one of the two or more forms in which an allotropic element can exist.
[1885–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·lo·trope

(ăl′ə-trōp′)
Any of several crystalline forms of a chemical element. Charcoal, graphite, and diamond are all allotropes of carbon.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

allotrope

An elements (such as oxygen, which can exist in its normal form and as ozone) which can exist with different physical properties while in the same physical state.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.allotrope - a structurally different form of an element; "graphite and diamond are allotropes of carbon"
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
allotrope

allotrope

[ˈæləˌtrəʊp] nallotropo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Carbon, one of the most abundant elements in the universe, can exist in different forms - called allotropes - giving it completely different properties from color to shape to hardness.
Many [sp.sup.2] carbon allotropes are efficient reinforcing fillers for rubber materials, including carbon black (refs.
Boron has two allotropes in the form of amorphous and crystalline.
Fullerenes are known as one of allotropes of carbon, along with nanotubes, graphite, diamond, graphene and amorphous carbon.
Indeed, graphene and other synthetic carbon allotropes are currently at the forefront of materials science and nanotechnology.
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are carbon allotropes such as diamond, graphite or fullerenes, and its structure can be like a graphene sheet rolled on itself (Lariza et al., 2012).
The allotropes of carbon family are fullerene (0-D), nanotubes (1-D), graphene (2-D), and graphite (3-D).
Carbon nanotubes are allotropes of carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure.
Their topics include titania nanomaterials as a future prospect, the enhanced photocatalytic activity of titania supported on different carbon allotropes for degrading pharmaceutical organic compounds, surface-modification and composite engineering metal chalcogenide electrodes for solar hydrogen production, photocatalysis based on silver phosphate: a brief review from fundamentals to applications, and modeling and optimizing the photocatalytic degradation process of 4-chlorophenol using response surface methodology and artificial neural networks.
Allotropes of carbon such as graphite, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene have attracted the interest of the researchers due to their special properties.
Carbon has a variety of allotropes owing to its capability of hybridization in sp, [sp.sup.2], and [sp.sup.3] bonds, which renders it able to form 0D (e.g., fullerenes), 1D (e.g., carbon nanotube), 2D (e.g., graphene), and 3D (e.g., diamond) structures and thus one of the most versatile elements in the periodic table.