allozyme


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allozyme

(ˈæləʊˌzaɪm)
n
(Biochemistry) any one of a number of different structural forms of the same enzyme coded for by a different allele
[C20: from allo- + (en)zyme]
References in periodicals archive ?
Allozyme patterns of Aedes albopictus, a vector of dengue in Thailand.
To answer this question we used allozyme and RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) markers to determine how much genetic variability exists in A.
We examined allozyme variation in this population for 20 loci in eleven enzyme systems.
Except for one locality, allozyme diversity was low in the northern populations (Table 4).
Our work finds congruence across allozyme and mitochondrial DNA data sets that supports division of the genus Ascaphus into two species, A.
(1977), who examined 1,384 moose from 3 areas of Sweden for polymorphism at 23 allozyme loci.
We ate currently screening variation at several allozyme loci, which will allow for comparison of many important population parameters such as percentage of polymorphic loci, average number of alleles per locus, average heterozygosiry, and the partitioning of genetic variance within and among populations.
Likewise, alleles at each locus were designated sequentially with the most anodally migrating allozyme designated "a" and progressively slower forms "b", "c", and so on.
Allozyme loci indicate significant interdemic genetic structure among recent colonists of new host trees, which weakens in the 10th generation and disappears by the 40th generation.
1995, Stangel 1991) have measured allozyme variation in geographically localized and dispersed populations.
Using allozyme analysis, several genetic studies in Japanese Abies showed their genetic diversity and possible dissemination following the last glacial period (Nagasaka et al.