Almagest


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Al·ma·gest

 (ăl′mə-jĕst′)
n.
1. A comprehensive treatise on astronomy, geography, and mathematics compiled by Ptolemy about ad 150.
2. almagest Any of several medieval treatises concerned with astronomy or alchemy.

[Middle English almageste, from Old French, from Arabic al-majisti : al-, the + Greek megistē (suntaxis), greatest (composition), feminine of megistos, greatest, superlative of megas, great; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Almagest

(ˈælməˌdʒɛst)
n
1. (Astronomy) a work on astronomy compiled by Ptolemy in the 2nd century ad containing a description of the geocentric system of the universe and a star catalogue
2. (Historical Terms) (sometimes not capital) any of various similar medieval treatises on astrology, astronomy, or alchemy
[C14: from Old French, from Arabic al-majisti, from al the + majisti, from Greek megistē greatest (treatise)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Al•ma•gest

(ˈæl məˌdʒɛst)

n.
1. (italics) a Greek work on astronomy and mathematics by Ptolemy.
2. (l.c.) any of various similar treatises by medieval writers.
[1350–1400; Middle English almageste < Middle French < Arabic al the + majisṭī < Greek megístē (sýntaxis) greatest (composition)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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But when it came to almagest and astrolabe, the counting of figures and reckoning of epicycles, away would go her thoughts to horse and hound, and a vacant eye and listless face would warn the teacher that he had lost his hold upon his scholar.
He especially asked the Byzantine Emperor for Almagest, Ptolemy's popular geocentric astronomical book, and had it translated in to Arabic.
The forty eight Greek classical patterns, as enumerated in both Aratus' work 'Phenomena' or Ptolemy's 'Almagest' were adopted by western cultures, although their existence predates these names by several centuries.
The Philosophical Justification for the Equant in Ptolemy's Almagest, JAMES L.
A Latin version of Ptolemy's Almagest showed the words ab ireo on the line just before the constellation's first star, and it seems to have been mistaken for the name of that star.
A: Owning a share in Almagest, which Sheikh Fahad Al Thani rode to victory in the 2016 Newmarket Town Plate, believed to be the oldest horse race in the world.
But then there was Giovanni Battista Riccioli, who, nineteen years after the appearance of Galileo's Dialogue on the Two Chief World Systems, published his massive New Almagest [1651 ], in which he weighed both scientific ("philosophical") and religious arguments for and against Copernican heliocentrism.
(90.) See, for instance, the lists of traits in Ptolemy's Almagest; or in Abu Ma'shar, The Abbreviation of the Introduction to Astrology, ed.
Johan Knattrup Jensen - 'Almagest', one of the installments in the exhibition