thresher shark

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thresher shark

n.
Any of various large sharks of the genus Alopias, especially A. vulpinus of warm and temperate waters worldwide, having a tail with a long whiplike upper lobe with which it strikes the surface of the water.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thresher shark - large pelagic shark of warm seas with a whiplike tail used to round up small fish on which to feedthresher shark - large pelagic shark of warm seas with a whiplike tail used to round up small fish on which to feed
shark - any of numerous elongate mostly marine carnivorous fishes with heterocercal caudal fins and tough skin covered with small toothlike scales
Alopius, genus Alopius - type genus of the family Alopiidae; in some classifications considered a genus of the family Lamnidae
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the strictly oophagous species, such as the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) and the common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus), multiple embryos per uterus, long gestation periods, and long resting periods (the period between parturition and the next pregnancy) with 1 or 2 years between pregnancies is typical (Mollet et al., 2000; Gilmore et al., 2005; Natanson and Gervelis, 2013).
The present study provides basic information on trophic interactions of four pelagic elasmobranchs captured by small-scale driftnet fisheries in northern Peru: the pelagic sharks Alopias spp., Sphyrnazygaena and Galeorhinus galeus, and the batoid Mobula japanica.
silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis), and thresher sharks (Alopias
Other marketable species, included opah, Lampris guttatus; bigeye thresher shark (BET), Alopias superciliosus; mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus; and escolar, Gempylidae; which comprised an additional 18.0% of total catch (Table 2, Fig.
Various pelagic fishes and invertebrates (zooplankton, jellyfish, siphonophores, crustaceans, and polychaetes) have been seen along the ridge, including mesopelagic fishes, freckled driftfish, Psenes cyanophrys, scombrids (juveniles and a large tuna), a thresher shark, Alopias pelagicus, a possible blue shark, and squid, Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis and Onychoteuthis [46, 48, 49].
Afinidades biogeograficas: Las afinidades biogeograficas muestran un numero elevado de especies de amplia distribucion (42 spp., 19.7% del total; Cuadro 2), estas son principalmente de habitos pelagicos y con distribucion en mares tropicales como Alopias superciliosus e Isurus oxyrinchus, mientras que otras se distribuyen en aguas templadas y frias (marcada antitropicalidad), como sucede con Carcharodon carcharias y Galeorhinus galeus.
First records for the Bigeye Thresher (Alopias superciliosus) and Slender Tuna (Allothunnus fallai) from California, with notes on eastern Pacific scombrid otoliths.
Preliminary studies on the age and growth of blue Prionace glauca, common thresher, Alopias vulpinus, and shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, sharks from California waters.
However, northeastern Pacific fishes such as Finescale Triggerfish (Balistes polylepis), Louvar (Luvarus imperialis), Skipjack Tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), Albacore Tuna (Thunnus alalunga), Pacific Mackerel (Scomber japonicus), Thresher Shark (Alopias vulpinus), Ocean Sunfish (Mola mola), Pacific Saury (Cololabis saira) and Pacific Pompano (Peprilus simillimus) are known to shift their range north during El Nino events and other warm periods (Karinen and others 1985; Pearcy and others 1985; Schoener and Fluharty 1985; Pearcy and Schoener 1987; Medred 2014; Bond and others 2015; Welch 2015a).
Otros peces capturados.--Tambien se capturaron peces que no eran objetivo de la pesca de perico, como el pez espada (Xiphias gladius), tiburon martillo (Sphyrna zygaena), pez zorro (Alopias vulpinus), atun (Thunnus sp.), Manta (Mobula japanica) y pez luna (Mola mola).