alpha-carotene


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alpha-carotene

n
(Biochemistry) a common form of carotene found in certain vegetables and fruit. See also betacarotene
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Though more research conducted on humans is necessary, there is some evidence to suggest that antioxidants such as alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin prevent free radicals from damaging health.
There are more than 600 types of carotenoids, beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin are some of the common types of carotenoids.
Gunter, "Retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, alpha-carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and four retinyl esters in serum determined simultaneously by reversed-phase HPLC with multiwavelength detection," Clinical Chemistry, vol.
Mango's Health Benefits: Mango fruit is an excellent source of vitamin-A and flavonoids like beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin.
Researchers from South Korea looked at data from 3,200 participants in the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and found that high blood levels of carotenoids, specifically alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxan-thin (found in red, orange, and yellow plant foods) were significantly associated with longer telomeres by 1.76%, 2.22%, and 2.02% respectively.
After a substantial research work they came to know that the mango peel contains carotenoids, such as the provitamin-A compound, beta-carotene, lutein and alpha-carotene. The extract of raw and ripened mango peel comprises of compounds that display significant antioxidant and antiproliferative activities associated with its total flavonoid composition.
In fact, this creamy, green fruit is packed with a host of different carotenoids, ranging from alpha-carotene to zeaxanthin, while also including lesser-known beneficial carotenoids such as neochrome.
A long study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia and the University of California in the US suggested the link between higher blood levels of alpha-carotene, which is found in carrots, and the reduction in risk of these diseases.
Once colonized, this strain produces physiologically significant amounts of beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein, lycopene, astaxanthin, and zeaxanthin at the site of absorption.
Beta-carotene and alpha-carotene are orange-pigmented carotenoids that act as antioxidants.
The risk of bladder cancer was also lower in women with the highest intakes of certain nutrients often found in plant foods, including vitamins A, C, and E, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and folate.