alpha-carotene


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alpha-carotene

n
(Biochemistry) a common form of carotene found in certain vegetables and fruit. See also betacarotene
References in periodicals archive ?
Mango's Health Benefits: Mango fruit is an excellent source of vitamin-A and flavonoids like beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin.
Researchers from South Korea looked at data from 3,200 participants in the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and found that high blood levels of carotenoids, specifically alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and beta-cryptoxan-thin (found in red, orange, and yellow plant foods) were significantly associated with longer telomeres by 1.
After a substantial research work they came to know that the mango peel contains carotenoids, such as the provitamin-A compound, beta-carotene, lutein and alpha-carotene.
In fact, this creamy, green fruit is packed with a host of different carotenoids, ranging from alpha-carotene to zeaxanthin, while also including lesser-known beneficial carotenoids such as neochrome.
A long study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia and the University of California in the US suggested the link between higher blood levels of alpha-carotene, which is found in carrots, and the reduction in risk of these diseases.
Once colonized, this strain produces physiologically significant amounts of beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein, lycopene, astaxanthin, and zeaxanthin at the site of absorption.
Beta-carotene and alpha-carotene are orange-pigmented carotenoids that act as antioxidants.
The risk of bladder cancer was also lower in women with the highest intakes of certain nutrients often found in plant foods, including vitamins A, C, and E, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and folate.
For sides, try carrots, rich in alpha-carotene and beta-carotene, which convert to vitamin A, essential for the manufacture of new skin cells.
According to the study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the anti-oxidant properties of different types of carotenoids such as alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin can help prevent cancerous tissue in the breast.
They are rich in both alpha-carotene and beta-carotene, the latter of which converts into vitamin A in your body, notes Larson.