Alte Pinakothek

(redirected from Alte Pinakothek, Munich)

Alte Pinakothek

(German ˈaltə pinakoˈteːk)
n
(Placename) a museum in Munich housing a collection of paintings dating from the Middle Ages to the late 18th century
References in periodicals archive ?
Painting: The Battle of Issus, 1529, Albrecht Altdorfer, Alte Pinakothek, Munich.
It has been suggested that the entry refers to the 'Lion Hunt' by Rubens, which is presently in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich.(14) Carew may have used 'panther' to refer generally to a big cat, with the term especially appropriate for verses praising song, due to the panther's reputed sweet breath.(15)
On the inner left wing a sequence of events is represented as takin, place simultaneously (a device which Memlinc increasingly used in his later paintings, such as the Retable of the Passion at Turin and The Seven Joys of the Virgin in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich).
Petersburg; Prado, Madrid; Musees Royaux des Beaus-Arts, Brussels; Gemaldegalerie, Berlin; Alte Pinakothek, Munich; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; and the National Gallery of Art, Washington.
Fall of the Damned, by Rubens; Alte Pinakothek, Munich (1959).
His vibrant Allegory of Europe of 1670 is closely related to an earlier work, Europe (1664), part of a series depicting the four regions of the world housed in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich. Such allegorical images often served the church--in this work, the woman depicting Europe is wearing a crown with a cross and the Pope is shown receiving a dignitary.
Paumgartner Alta Triptych, Our Lady of Sorrows and Lamentation of Christ, by Durer; Alte Pinakothek, Munich (1988).
The problem is that the exhibition is curated in a way that draws attention to the omissions by repeatedly referring to influential paintings that are too large, too fragile or too precious to borrow: The Fall of the Damned (1621) in the Alte Pinakothek, Munich; Coup de Lance (1620) in the Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp; or the cycle of scenes from the life of Marie de Medicis in the Louvre, for example.
By 1620 the Hofkriche at Neuburg had received from Rubens a Nativity and a Descent of the Holy Spirit (both now at Schleissheim) and a Last Judgement (Alte Pinakothek, Munich).