altruism

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Related to Altruistic behavior: Altruists

al·tru·ism

 (ăl′tro͞o-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Unselfish concern for the welfare of others; selflessness.
2. Zoology Instinctive behavior that is detrimental to the individual but favors the survival or spread of that individual's genes, as by benefiting its relatives.

[French altruisme, probably from Italian altrui, someone else, from Latin alter, other; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

al′tru·ist n.
al′tru·is′tic adj.
al′tru·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

altruism

(ˈæltruːˌɪzəm)
n
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
2. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that right action is that which produces the greatest benefit to others
[C19: from French altruisme, from Italian altrui others, from Latin alterī, plural of alter other]
ˈaltruist n
ˌaltruˈistic adj
ˌaltruˈistically adv

al•tru•ism

(ˈæl truˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others (opposed to egoism).
2. behavior by an animal that may be to its disadvantage but that benefits others of its kind.
[1850–55; < French altruisme=autru(i) others + -isme -ism]
al′tru•ist, n.
al`tru•is′tic, adj.
al`tru•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

altruism

a concern or regard for the needs of others, entirely without ulterior motive. — altruist, n.altruistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.altruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of othersaltruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
unselfishness - the quality of not putting yourself first but being willing to give your time or money or effort etc. for others; "rural people show more devotion and unselfishness than do their urban cousins"
egocentrism, self-centeredness, self-concern, self-interest, egoism - concern for your own interests and welfare

altruism

altruism

noun
Translations
altruismus
altruizam
利他主義
altruism

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzəm] Naltruismo m

altruism

[ˈæltruɪzəm] naltruisme m

altruism

nAltruismus m

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzm] naltruismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists also believe that altruistic behavior releases endorphins in the brain, producing the positive feeling known as the helper's high.
But in a new study, researchers were interested in examining altruistic behavior.
This is not an altruistic behavior," said entomologist Erik Frank of the University of WE-rzburg in Germany, who led the research published in the journal Science Advances.
That's because altruistic behavior can deliver at least as much mental and physical benefit to the giver as to the receiver, according to researchers.
Although the author often claims that his theory is scientific, there is not enough evidence to fully endorse ABT as the underlying process involved in altruistic behavior.
They also show how empathy motives increase altruistic behavior in selfish people.
As green product consumption is an altruistic behavior that can provide a positive, proenvironmental signal to others and/or show the social status of consumers (Griskevicius et al.
By contrast, the economist Gary Becker once argued that evolutionary "models of group selection [including the variant called 'kin selection'] are unnecessary since altruistic behavior can be selected as a consequence of individual rationality" (The Economic Approach to Human Behavior [Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976], p.
Another aspect of the cognitive factor is the notion that individuals who have greater perspective-taking ability also have higher levels of empathic concern, which increases altruistic behavior (Eisenberg, Miller, Shell, McNalley, & Shea, 1991).
In nature, absent humans, you rarely find truly altruistic behavior, and when you do, there's an explanation available that shows how that behavior arises through what you might call natural causes.
Altruism is not only viewed as an important value in relationship-oriented societies such as those in the Chinesespeaking world, but there is also considered to be an increasing need for the acquisition of altruistic behavior in educational systems (Baytiyeh & Pfaffman, 2010; Etxebarria et al.
The authors also find that the altruistic behavior of migrants, as measured by the frequency of their donations in their new countries, is strongly determined by social norms in their new countries, while also retaining some effect of the levels of generosity found in their birth countries.