altruism

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al·tru·ism

 (ăl′tro͞o-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Unselfish concern for the welfare of others; selflessness.
2. Zoology Instinctive behavior that is detrimental to the individual but favors the survival or spread of that individual's genes, as by benefiting its relatives.

[French altruisme, probably from Italian altrui, someone else, from Latin alter, other; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

al′tru·ist n.
al′tru·is′tic adj.
al′tru·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

altruism

(ˈæltruːˌɪzəm)
n
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
2. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that right action is that which produces the greatest benefit to others
[C19: from French altruisme, from Italian altrui others, from Latin alterī, plural of alter other]
ˈaltruist n
ˌaltruˈistic adj
ˌaltruˈistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al•tru•ism

(ˈæl truˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others (opposed to egoism).
2. behavior by an animal that may be to its disadvantage but that benefits others of its kind.
[1850–55; < French altruisme=autru(i) others + -isme -ism]
al′tru•ist, n.
al`tru•is′tic, adj.
al`tru•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

altruism

a concern or regard for the needs of others, entirely without ulterior motive. — altruist, n.altruistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.altruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of othersaltruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
unselfishness - the quality of not putting yourself first but being willing to give your time or money or effort etc. for others; "rural people show more devotion and unselfishness than do their urban cousins"
egocentrism, self-centeredness, self-concern, self-interest, egoism - concern for your own interests and welfare
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

altruism

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

altruism

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
altruismus
altruizam
利他主義
altruism

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzəm] Naltruismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

altruism

[ˈæltruɪzəm] naltruisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

altruism

nAltruismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzm] naltruismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
First, we show that in the early stages of family businesses, altruistic behavior has the potential to align the interests of family and kin and to help build a competitive advantage.
A person-situation approach to altruistic behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 51, 1001-1012.
One last connection of social learning theory and altruism comes from research on gender and altruistic behavior. It appears that males and females differ in the type of assistance they are likely to give, and that this qualitative difference may be based on beliefs and social norms about appropriate helping behaviors for each gender.
Some, but not all, rescuers certainly gave religious reasons for their altruistic behavior.
A major concern of sociobiologists is the nature and origin of altruistic behavior: Why has altruism evolved?
In order to engage students in altruistic behavior, institutional and environmental factors that promote public service must be in place (Anderson & Moore, 1978).
In time, it might help explain social behaviors that increase public trust, altruistic behavior, and selfishness.
An overview of studies on altruistic behavior suggests that two character traits appear most significant in motivating charitable activity: a capacity for empathy and a sense of human or group solidarity.
With this analysis, it is apparent that extracurricular participation has an effect that is nearly three times that of the family-level variable of mother's religious practice on altruistic behavior. This result seems to suggest that participation in school-sponsored activities can promote positive social behaviors independent of family religious practices and parenting style.
(2002) recently conducted a study to measure the effect of perspective taking and empathic concern upon altruistic behavior. The authors note that this study like similar types of research before, found no correlation between perspective taking and altruism.
But in the last few decades, biologists have shown that animals can exhibit concern for one another as well as altruistic behavior, reconciliatory action, and peacemaking tendencies.
After examining one evolutionary basis of cooperation and competition, Rubin moves to trying to explain altruistic behavior within an evolutionary framework.