altruism

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Related to Altruists: unselfishness, altruism

al·tru·ism

 (ăl′tro͞o-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Unselfish concern for the welfare of others; selflessness.
2. Zoology Instinctive behavior that is detrimental to the individual but favors the survival or spread of that individual's genes, as by benefiting its relatives.

[French altruisme, probably from Italian altrui, someone else, from Latin alter, other; see al- in Indo-European roots.]

al′tru·ist n.
al′tru·is′tic adj.
al′tru·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

altruism

(ˈæltruːˌɪzəm)
n
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
2. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that right action is that which produces the greatest benefit to others
[C19: from French altruisme, from Italian altrui others, from Latin alterī, plural of alter other]
ˈaltruist n
ˌaltruˈistic adj
ˌaltruˈistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

al•tru•ism

(ˈæl truˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the principle or practice of unselfish concern for the welfare of others (opposed to egoism).
2. behavior by an animal that may be to its disadvantage but that benefits others of its kind.
[1850–55; < French altruisme=autru(i) others + -isme -ism]
al′tru•ist, n.
al`tru•is′tic, adj.
al`tru•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

altruism

a concern or regard for the needs of others, entirely without ulterior motive. — altruist, n.altruistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.altruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of othersaltruism - the quality of unselfish concern for the welfare of others
unselfishness - the quality of not putting yourself first but being willing to give your time or money or effort etc. for others; "rural people show more devotion and unselfishness than do their urban cousins"
egocentrism, self-centeredness, self-concern, self-interest, egoism - concern for your own interests and welfare
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

altruism

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

altruism

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
altruismus
altruizam
利他主義
altruism

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzəm] Naltruismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

altruism

[ˈæltruɪzəm] naltruisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

altruism

nAltruismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

altruism

[ˈæltrʊɪzm] naltruismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
We studied the brains and behavior of some extraordinary altruists: people who have donated one of their own kidneys to a total stranger, known as nondirected donors.
Specifically, the authors investigate who they see as the primary actors in the mission to fight AIDS, from the "altruists" who envision themselves playing a critical role in saving African lives, to the African "brokers" who act as the middlemen and guides between Western altruists and the communities they want to affect, to the "villagers" who dream of their lives being dramatically transformed by the intervention of Westerners.
Professor Abigail Marsh, who works as a psychologist and neuroscientist at Georgetown University, Washington DC, refers to such people as altruists and says they are the opposite of psychopaths, who have zero empathy.
'This spirit requires to be reinvigorated as it seems the altruists are forgetting this noble cause.' he regretted.
Three Filipino business leaders landed on Forbes Asia Magazines' 2018 'Heroes of Philanthropy,' an honor roll of altruists from Asia-Pacific who devote big bucks to support a special cause.
"Out of the Wreckage" shows how new findings in psychology, neuroscience and evolutionary biology cast human nature in a radically different light: as the supreme altruists and cooperators.
They are the world's altruists, whose purity of purpose lends them the authority that no others possess.
We look toward the altruists and the wealthy to help, and we see ourselves as mere extras in a Hollywood action movie, just waiting for the "chosen one" to save the others.
In the right amygdala, an emotion-sensitive brain region, altruists displayed greater neural activity.
Altruists therefore are assumed to self-sacrifice for the good of the many.
We found that people who are work and life altruists, the givers, are more engaged.
Based on an extensive review of open-source journalistic reports, we examined the available psychobiographic information and histories of 43 lone wolf terrorists and have been able to differentiate four types of lone wolves: glory seekers, hero worshipers, lonely romantics, and radical altruists (Behav.