Joseph's coat

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Related to Amaranthus tricolor: Amaranthus hybridus
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Noun1.Joseph's coat - perennial aromatic herb of southeastern Asia having large usually bright-colored or blotched leaves and spikes of blue-violet flowersJoseph's coat - perennial aromatic herb of southeastern Asia having large usually bright-colored or blotched leaves and spikes of blue-violet flowers; sometimes placed in genus Solenostemon
coleus, flame nettle - any of various Old World tropical plants of the genus Coleus having multicolored decorative leaves and spikes of blue flowers
References in periodicals archive ?
Photosynthetic adaptation to salt stress in three-color leaves of a [C.sub.4] plant Amaranthus tricolor. Plant and Cell Physiology 40: 668-674.
Biomass yield and accumulations of bioactive compounds in red amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor L.) grown under different colored shade polyethylene in spring season.
[10.] Shukla S, Bhargava A, Chatterjee A, Srivastava J, Singh N and SP Singh Mineral profile and variability in vegetable amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor).
Exploiting study on the red pigment in Amaranthus tricolor. Acta Agric.
However, comparative view of the cluster showed that the Amaranthus hypochondriacus were closest to the China variety than to the Amaranthus tricolor according to their morphological characters.
These plants included Coriandrum sativum, Allium cepa, Allium sativum, Nigella sativa, Curcuma longa (various plants parts used as spices, leaves of Allium cepa also eaten as vegetable), Amaranthus tricolor, Colocasia esculenta, Typhonium giganteum, Basella rubra, Spinacia oleracea, Ipomoea aquatica, Cucurbita pepo, Lagenaria siceraria, Cicer arietinum, Corchorus capsularis, Centella asiatica (various plant parts eaten as vegetable), Brassica napus (leaves and stems eaten as vegetable, seed used to extract oil), Momordica charantia, Citrus grandis, Capsicum frutescens (fruits eaten), Cajanus cajan, Lathyrus sativus, and Vigna mungo (seeds boiled and eaten as lentil soup).