laws

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laws

  • autonomy - From Greek autos, "self," and nomos, "law," i.e. a person or unit that makes its own laws.
  • blue sky laws - Laws protecting the public from securities fraud.
  • code, codex - Code, from Latin codex, meaning "block of wood split into tablets, document written on wood tablets," was first a set of laws.
  • constitute, constitution - Constitute can mean "make laws" and a constitution is a "how-to" document for a government or organization.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laws - the first of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures comprising the first five books of the Hebrew Bible considered as a unitLaws - the first of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures comprising the first five books of the Hebrew Bible considered as a unit
Book of Genesis, Genesis - the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers
Book of Exodus, Exodus - the second book of the Old Testament: tells of the departure of the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt led by Moses; God gave them the Ten Commandments and the rest of Mosaic law on Mount Sinai during the Exodus
Book of Leviticus, Leviticus - the third book of the Old Testament; contains Levitical law and ritual precedents
Book of Numbers, Numbers - the fourth book of the Old Testament; contains a record of the number of Israelites who followed Moses out of Egypt
Book of Deuteronomy, Deuteronomy - the fifth book of the Old Testament; contains a second statement of Mosaic law
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Hebrew Scripture, Tanach, Tanakh - the Jewish scriptures which consist of three divisions--the Torah and the Prophets and the Writings
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is known as Amdahl's Law. The sequential fraction f of the program may consist of:
According to Lindahl, it's not that hard to improve individual software routines, but then Amdahl's Law asserts itself, exposing bottlenecks in other routines.
Amdahl's law can forecast the speedup of parallel processing through both the sequential portion of an application and the number of processors used, and thus, to predict the power consumption, several researches exploited the idea of Amdahl's law [13].
When analyzing parallel architectures, a lot of the scientific papers refer to the Amdahl's law that is useful to forecast, from the theoretical point of view, the speedup that might be obtained if one uses more processing units.
He also formulated Amdahl's Law, a formula that predicts the theoretical maximum improvement possible using multiple processors.
The restrictions on the system capability can be estimated by Amdahl's law which states that, under the assumption of equal speed of all computations in the case where the problem is divided into several parts, the total time of its execution by a parallel system cannot be less than the time required for the execution of the longest fragment [12].
Amdahl proposed a formula f with proportion relation of speedup, number of CPU of processors and calculation parts which cannot be analyzed by parallel algorithm, which is also known as Amdahl's law [13].
Amdahl's law tells us that, at the ideal limit, the time to solution will ultimately be dictated by the runtime of the serial sections of the code.
From a formal point of view, the (maximum) speedup that an algorithm can provide on a parallel computing platform is given by Amdahl's law, which has been originally formulated by Amdahl in the 1960s [1].
In many applications, Amdahl's Law will present an intractable obstacle to further performance growth.