modernism

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mod·ern·ism

 (mŏd′ər-nĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Modern thought, character, or practice.
b. Sympathy with or conformity to modern ideas, practices, or standards.
2. A peculiarity of usage or style, as of a word or phrase, that is characteristic of modern times.
3. often Modernism The deliberate departure from tradition and the use of innovative forms of expression that distinguish many styles in the arts and literature of the 1900s.
4. often Modernism A Roman Catholic movement, officially condemned in 1907, that attempted to examine traditional belief according to contemporary philosophy, criticism, and historiography.

mod′ern·ist n.
mod′ern·is′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

modernism

(ˈmɒdəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. modern tendencies, characteristics, thoughts, etc, or the support of these
2. something typical of contemporary life or thought
3. (Art Movements) a 20th-century divergence in the arts from previous traditions, esp in architecture. See International Style
4. (Architecture) a 20th-century divergence in the arts from previous traditions, esp in architecture. See International Style
5. (Roman Catholic Church) (capital) RC Church the movement at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries that sought to adapt doctrine to the supposed requirements of modern thought
ˈmodernist n, adj
ˌmodernˈistic adj
ˌmodernˈistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mod•ern•ism

(ˈmɒd ərˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. modern character, tendencies, or values.
2. a modern usage or characteristic.
3. (cap.)
a. the movement in Roman Catholic thought that interpreted the teachings of the Church in the light of modern philosophic and scientific thought.
b. the liberal theological tendency in 20th-century Protestantism.
4. (sometimes cap.) estrangement or divergence from the past in the arts and literature occurring esp. in the course of the 20th century and taking form in any of various innovative movements and styles.
[1730–40]
mod′ern•ist, n., adj.
mod`ern•is′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

modernism

a mode of expression or practice characteristic of modern times. — modernist, n.modernistic, adj.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modernism - genre of art and literature that makes a self-conscious break with previous genresmodernism - genre of art and literature that makes a self-conscious break with previous genres
genre - a class of art (or artistic endeavor) having a characteristic form or technique
2.modernism - the quality of being current or of the presentmodernism - the quality of being current or of the present; "a shopping mall would instill a spirit of modernity into this village"
currentness, up-to-dateness, currency - the property of belonging to the present time; "the currency of a slang term"
3.modernism - practices typical of contemporary life or thought
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

modernism

[ˈmɒdənɪzəm] Nmodernismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

modernism

nModernismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

modernism

[ˈmɒdənɪzəm] n (Art) → modernismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Claudia Tate locates in African American modernist fiction - or "allegories of desire" - a recurrent trope of black male flight from the entanglements of marriage.
Published in conjunction with an exhibition of the same name organized by the Portland Museum of Art (Portland, Maine), this oversize (10.25x11.5") catalog presents the art of American modernist painter Rockwell Kent.
IN CONTRAST to Zittel's usable hybrids, Jorge Pardo's elegantly designed tables, chairs, and light fixtures (unabashedly inspired by European and American modernist design classics) would be right at home in any number of SoHo furniture showrooms.
1962), Daniel Aaron's Writers on the Left: Episodes in American Literary Communism (1961), and Hugh Kenner's A Homemade World: The American Modernist Writers (1975) all avoid serious engagement with black writers such as Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Marita Bonner, William Attaway, Dorothy West, and Sterling Brown.
US, British, and Australian scholars of anthropology, literature, history, and other fields consider such topics as the challenges of acoustic ecology, early modern medical explanations for music's effects, mining vibrations in American Modernist music, and acoustical engineers and the empire of sound in the motion picture industry from 1927 to 1930.
Arthur Dove is not - thank God - the kind of artist whose retrospective provokes in a critic the desire either to (a) rehearse a long, drawn-out chronology of the various ebbs and flows in his stylistic development or to (b) mount an argumentative, academic brief for his being an underrated or overrated early American Modernist. The eighty or so modest-size paintings, collages, and drawings at the Whitney Museum are simply - and I mean "simply" in perhaps the most favorable sense I've ever used the word - there, on the wall, to be looked at, absorbed, appreciated, enjoyed, and remembered.
The theater of trauma; American modernist drama and the psychological struggle for the American mind, 1900-1930.
At first glance these stills stand in stark contrast to her abstract paintings, yet the paintings more strongly evoke flickering images torn from cinema than they resemble abstractions familiar to us from the history of European and American Modernist painting.
In this way African American cultural nationalism and "amalgamationist" expectations stood in uncertain, inherently ironic, and productively experimental relation to each other, together providing a crucial issue for African American modernist authors - such as Jean Toomer, George Schuyler, Georgia Douglas Johnson, and Nella Larsen - to address in varying ways.
Blanche Lazzell; the life and work of an American modernist.
In addition, McKay's highly allusive style and his emphasis on alienation link him with those writers who have been regarded as central to the American modernist movement--Eliot and Pound.
Martin's school would be the conduit by which American Modernist values closed down the open, antihierarchical directions exemplified in these collective endeavors.

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