naturalism

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Related to American Naturalism: American romanticism

nat·u·ral·ism

 (năch′ər-ə-lĭz′əm, năch′rə-)
n.
1. Factual or realistic representation, especially:
a. The practice of describing precisely the actual circumstances of human life in literature.
b. The practice of reproducing subjects as precisely as possible in the visual arts.
2.
a. A movement or school advocating such precise representation.
b. The principles and methods of such a movement or of its adherents.
3. Philosophy The system of thought holding that all phenomena can be explained in terms of natural causes and laws.
4. Theology The doctrine that all religious truths are derived from nature and natural causes and not from revelation.
5. Conduct or thought prompted by natural desires or instincts.

naturalism

(ˈnætʃrəˌlɪzəm; -tʃərə-)
n
1. (Art Movements)
a. a movement, esp in art and literature, advocating detailed realistic and factual description, esp that in 19th-century France in the writings of Zola, Flaubert, etc
b. the characteristics or effects of this movement
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements)
a. a movement, esp in art and literature, advocating detailed realistic and factual description, esp that in 19th-century France in the writings of Zola, Flaubert, etc
b. the characteristics or effects of this movement
3. (Art Movements) a school of painting or sculpture characterized by the faithful imitation of appearances for their own sake
4. (Theology) the belief that all religious truth is based not on revelation but rather on the study of natural causes and processes
5. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. a scientific account of the world in terms of causes and natural forces that rejects all spiritual, supernatural, or teleological explanations
b. the meta-ethical thesis that moral properties are reducible to natural ones, or that ethical judgments are derivable from nonethical ones. Compare naturalistic fallacy, descriptivism
6. action or thought caused by natural desires and instincts
7. devotion to that which is natural

nat•u•ral•ism

(ˈnætʃ ər əˌlɪz əm, ˈnætʃ rə-)

n.
1. a literary style combining a deterministic view of human nature and a nonidealistic, detailed observation of events.
2. (in a work of art) treatment of forms, colors, space, etc., as they appear or might appear in nature.
3. the theory of literary or artistic naturalism.
4. Philos. the belief that all phenomena are covered by laws of science and that all teleological explanations are therefore without value.
6. adherence or attachment to what is natural.
[1635–45]

Naturalism

the goal of artists who attempt to represent a subject without stylization or interpretation, and to create a mirror for natural beauty. Cf. Verism. Also called Realism. — Naturalist, n.Naturalistic, adj.
See also: Art
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.naturalism - (philosophy) the doctrine that the world can be understood in scientific terms without recourse to spiritual or supernatural explanations
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.naturalism - an artistic movement in 19th century France; artists and writers strove for detailed realistic and factual description
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles

naturalism

noun realism, authenticity, plausibility, verisimilitude, factualism the closely observed naturalism of this superbly understated tale
Translations

naturalism

[ˈnætʃrəlɪzəm] Nnaturalismo m

naturalism

[ˈnætʃərəlɪzəm] nnaturalisme m

naturalism

nNaturalismus m

naturalism

[ˈnætʃrəˌlɪzm] n (Art, Literature) → naturalismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, Johnson's novel aptly illustrates how American naturalism emerges out of a dialogue with temperance discourse and its twin techniques of sentimental compassion and melodramatic excess.
He stirred European avant-garde into American naturalism, subverted classical roles of protagonist and antagonist, broke with conventional story structure, challenged long-held and deeply felt social mores, even tinkered at the level of the sentence and created deceptively convoluted syntax.
Though our literature and nation have produced great pantheists, in the generative outpourings of Emerson, John Muir, Thoreau, Dickinson, Whitman, and in the relatively recent publication of Native American literature, when Ronald Reagan said if you've seen one redwood tree you've seen them all, he was only expressing another form of American naturalism which, borrowing from the early churches, produced a citizenry and a literature enmeshed in the throes of pre-determination, which our commitment to the physical and spiritual laws of manifest destiny made sovereign.
American Naturalism and the Jews: Garland, Norris, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather, by Donald Pizer.
His new book, American Naturalism and the Jews, however, marks the first time in his prolific career that he directly addresses the subject of antisemitism among authors about whom he has written for decades.
The first two chapters of the book present an insightful analysis of the historical context that set the stage for the later development of American naturalism.
American naturalism, as exemplified by such writers as Crane, Norris, and Dreiser, involved a middle class narrator acting as what James R.

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