pragmatism

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Related to American Pragmatism: John Dewey

prag·ma·tism

(prăg′mə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy A movement consisting of varying but associated theories, originally developed by Charles S. Peirce and William James and distinguished by the doctrine that the meaning or truth value of an idea or a proposition lies in its observable practical consequences.
2. A practical, matter-of-fact way of approaching or assessing situations or of solving problems.

prag′ma·tist n.
prag′ma·tis′tic adj.

pragmatism

(ˈpræɡməˌtɪzəm)
n
1. action or policy dictated by consideration of the immediate practical consequences rather than by theory or dogma
2. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that the content of a concept consists only in its practical applicability
b. the doctrine that truth consists not in correspondence with the facts but in successful coherence with experience. See also instrumentalism
ˈpragmatist n, adj
ˌpragmaˈtistic adj

prag•ma•tism

(ˈpræg məˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. character or conduct that emphasizes practical results or concerns rather than theory or principle.
2. a philosophical movement or system having various forms, but generally stressing practical consequences as constituting the essential criterion in determining meaning, truth, or value.
[1860–65]
prag′ma•tist, n., adj.
prag`ma•tis′tic, adj.

pragmatism

a philosophical system stressing practical consequences and values as standards by which the validity of concepts are to be determined. — pragmatist, n., adj.pragmatistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

pragmatism

An American philosophical school; the view that the meaning of things is in their practical relation to people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pragmatism - (philosophy) the doctrine that practical consequences are the criteria of knowledge and meaning and value
instrumentalism - a system of pragmatic philosophy that considers idea to be instruments that should guide our actions and their value is measured by their success
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.pragmatism - the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth
practicality - concerned with actual use rather than theoretical possibilities
Translations
pragmatisme
pragmatismo

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] Npragmatismo m

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] npragmatisme m

pragmatism

nPragmatismus m

pragmatism

[ˈprægməˌtɪzm] npragmatismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Charles Sanders Peirce, the founder of American pragmatism, was on the faculty in the 1880s.
For example, our narrative should provide practical, common-sense solutions that draw on American pragmatism.
Social inequality, power, and politics: Intersectionality and american pragmatism in dialogue.
Scult notes, "It is a mistake-one that he [Kaplan] himself generally encouraged in his published writings-to see him as living and working in the narrow space of American pragmatism and sociology" (223).
The editors offer several reasons why philosophers have so far overlooked or avoided Thoreau despite the fact that, according to Cavell, his work embodies a rigorous "mode of conceptual accuracy," despite his obvious familiarity with Western and Asian philosophical resources, and despite what several contributors here regard as clear anticipations not only of American pragmatism but also phenomenology.
For example, Jones leans quite heavily on the American pragmatism of John Dewey without fleshing out the exact connections between Dewey's epistemology and his own.
This was American pragmatism at its most obvious, as economics is thought to transcend ideology and history in conditioning national priorities.
His "prophetic pragmatism" is theologically shaped by biblical tradition and contemporary social ethics; it is honed philosophically by American pragmatism, especially its current environmental incarnation; and it converses with ongoing discourses in religion and ecology.
Moreover, Koopman's careful analysis of Foucaultian method opens up a space for normative interventions based on Foucault's work, specifically in a methodological mix of American pragmatism, Habermasian critical theory, and Foucaultian genealogy.
While the introduction's technicalities might put some new readers off, the book could still serve as an excellent text for an introductory course in American Pragmatism or, given the plentiful references to contemporary political science literature on Dewey, a course in American Political Thought.
For only American pragmatism, can keep the self-absorbed Netanyahu in check at home and abroad.

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