Neo-Fascism

(redirected from American fascism)

neo-fascism

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics a modern right-wing political movement that includes significant elements of fascism, esp inspired by fascist Italy

Neo-Fascism

the post-World War II rise of a movement whose principal aim is to incorporate the doctrines of fascism into existing political systems. — Neo-Facist, n.
See also: Fascism
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References in periodicals archive ?
When 300 students gathered in front of Johnson Hall to protest militarism, police states and American fascism, Johnson took a bullhorn and politely defended police being on campus in those troubled times - for everyone's safety.
1 certainly would not argue that American fascism did not exist in the 1930s, but Gary Cooper's face is not the one that immediately comes to mind.
This was supposed to be the seat of American fascism from where Hitler would one day rule the United States," historian Randy Young said.
The West should rest assured that the regional revolutions have found their path and have ripped the curtains of the International American fascism and their (the western states') anger cannot save the US-puppet dictators in the region," he added.
By focusing on the Rosenbergs as victims of American fascism and anti-Semitism, the Soviets hoped to deflect attention away from what they were doing in their own bloc.
More sophisticated considerations of how fascism might come to America, such as It Can't Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis, emphasize that American fascism would most likely manifest itself in the guise of right-wing populism.
By contrast, Harry Jaffa, a Lincoln enthusiast, declared that views like Kendall's amounted to "a distinctive American fascism, or national socialism.
In discussing their backlash to the 2006 Congressional elections, Thoreau emphasizes the role of progressive Internet media in averting all-out American fascism.
Furthermore, he provocatively argues that an unholy alliance of fundamentalist propagandists and right wing politicians is playing its part in the rise of a new American fascism.
In the first chapter, "The Origins of Italian American Fascism," Cannistraro focuses on the founding figure of Italian Fascism in the United States, Agostino De Biasi.
By 1932 Browder managed to shoulder aside the ailing Foster and assume de facto leadership of the party during the early days of the New Deal, which the Communists (following Moscow's "Third Period" policy of militancy) denounced as the advent of American fascism.
There are two important things for us to remember about the Ebony & Ivory of American fascism.

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