goldfinch

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gold·finch

 (gōld′fĭnch′)
n.
1. Any of several small American finches of the genus Spinus, especially S. tristis, of which the male has yellow plumage with a black forehead, wings, and tail.
2. A small finch (Carduelis carduelis) of Eurasia and Africa, having brownish plumage with black-and-yellow wings and a red patch across the face.

goldfinch

(ˈɡəʊldˌfɪntʃ)
n
1. (Animals) a common European finch, Carduelis carduelis, the adult of which has a red-and-white face and yellow-and-black wings
2. (Animals) any of several North American finches of the genus Spinus, esp the yellow-and-black species S. tristis

gold•finch

(ˈgoʊldˌfɪntʃ)

n.
1. any of several New World finches of the genus Carduelis, esp. the widespread North American species C. tristis, the male of which has yellow body plumage in the summer.
2. a related Old World finch, Carduelis carduelis, having a crimson face and wings marked with yellow.
[before 1000]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.goldfinch - American finch whose male has yellow body plumage in summergoldfinch - American finch whose male has yellow body plumage in summer
finch - any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
genus Spinus, Spinus - in some classifications considered a subgenus of Carduelis: siskins and New World goldfinches
2.goldfinch - small European finch having a crimson face and yellow-and-black wingsgoldfinch - small European finch having a crimson face and yellow-and-black wings
finch - any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
Carduelis, genus Carduelis - in some classifications considered the type genus of a subfamily Carduelinae of the family Fringillidae: goldfinches; siskins; redpolls; linnets

goldfinch

noun
Related words
collective noun charm
Translations
amerikantiklitikli
tengelic
stillissstillits
szczygieł
steglits

goldfinch

[ˈgəʊldfɪntʃ] Njilguero m

goldfinch

[ˈgəʊldˌfɪntʃ] ncardellino
References in periodicals archive ?
Attracts house finches, chickadees, American goldfinches and butterflies.
A preferred food of American goldfinches, lesser goldfinches, house finches and common redpolls, nyjer is sometimes called "black gold" because, at about $1.50 per pound, it's more expensive than other birdseeds.
From time to time, I would visit my grandparents in Henrietta, a suburb that was then "in the country." There 1 began to notice other kinds of birds; the first I remember were red-winged blackbirds, American goldfinches, common crows and great blue herons.
But some species of native feeder birds, including American goldfinches, purple finches, evening and pine grosbeaks -- all members of the same family -- have been infected by conjunctivitis, though to a far less catastrophic degree.
European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), and American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis) were the most abundant birds during the study, accounting for 21.8%, 9.8%, and 8.2% of the total observations, respectively.
Common redpolls and pine siskins are sensitive to salmonella infection; however it can also affect other feeder birds including American goldfinches and other finches.
I jotted down countless crows, flocks of American goldfinches, several brown thrashers, a few chipping sparrows, eastern bluebirds, doves, at least three species of woodpeckers, swallows, starlings, gray catbirds, phoebes, and 25 red-tailed hawks.
Exceptions in June 2008 were Red-winged Blackbirds, which probably nested or foraged in wet wire zones, American Goldfinches, which foraged in wire zones, and Eastern Kingbirds (Tyrannus tyrannus), which used the towers as perches and possibly as nest sites as at the Green Lane Research and Demonstration Area (RDA) (Yahner et al.
But a new study of American goldfinches by Professor Kristen Navara of the University of Georgia in Athens, US and colleagues at Auburn University, Alabama, is the first to show that high levels of brightly coloured chemicals in feathers leads to a breakdown in flight muscles, which affects flight performance, reports the BBC.

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