neurasthenia

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Related to American nervousness: nervous exhaustion

neu·ras·the·ni·a

 (no͝or′əs-thē′nē-ə, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A group of symptoms, including chronic physical and mental fatigue, weakness, and generalized aches and pains, formerly thought to result from exhaustion of the nervous system and now usually considered a psychological disorder. The term is no longer in clinical use in many parts of the world.

neu′ras·then′ic (-thĕn′ĭk) adj. & n.
neu′ras·then′i·cal·ly adv.

neurasthenia

(ˌnjʊərəsˈθiːnɪə)
n
(Psychiatry) an obsolete technical term for a neurosis characterized by extreme lassitude and inability to cope with any but the most trivial tasks
neurasthenic adj, n
neurastheniac n
ˌneurasˈthenically adv

neur•as•the•ni•a

(ˌnʊər əsˈθi ni ə, ˌnyʊər-)

n.
1. a pattern of symptoms including chronic fatigue, sleep disturbances, and persistent aches, often linked with depression.
2. prostration due to extreme emotional distress or dejection.
[1855–60]
neur`as•then′ic (-ˈθɛn ɪk) adj., n.
neur`as•then′i•cal•ly, adv.

neurasthenia

- A disorder characterized by loss of energy, lack of motivation, and feelings of inadequacy, along with vague physical symptoms such as headache or muscle pain.
See also related terms for headache.

neurasthenia

1. Medicine. a nervous debility and exhaustion, as from overwork or prolonged nervous strain.
2. popularly, a nervous breakdown, — neurasthenie, adj.
See also: Nerves
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neurasthenia - nervous breakdown (not in technical use)
nervous breakdown - a severe or incapacitating emotional disorder
Translations

neurasthenia

[ˌnjʊərəsˈθiːnɪə] Nneurastenia f

neurasthenia

neur·as·the·ni·a

n. neurastenia, término asociado con un estado general de irritabilidad y agotamiento nervioso;
angiopathic ______ angiopática;
gravis ______ grave;
praecox ______ precoz;
primary ______ primaria;
pulsating ______ pulsativa.
References in periodicals archive ?
The long history of American nervousness towards foreigners, immigrants, ethnicity, and the potential danger to national security of these groups and individuals is made clear in this detailed analysis by Lees (history, Old Dominion U.
In the first chapter, we find a section from The Causes of American Nervousness by George M.
Beard, American Nervousness, Its Causes and Consequences (New York, 1881); John S.

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