Americanize

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A·mer·i·can·ize

 (ə-mĕr′ĭ-kə-nīz′)
v. A·mer·i·can·ized, A·mer·i·can·iz·ing, A·mer·i·can·iz·es
v.tr.
1. To make American in form, style, or character.
2. To absorb or assimilate into American culture.
3. To bring under American influence or control.
v.intr.
To become American, as in spirit.

A·mer′i·can·i·za′tion (-kə-nĭ-zā′shən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Americanize

(əˈmɛrɪkəˌnaɪz) or

Americanise

vb
to make or become American in outlook, attitudes, etc
Aˌmericaniˈzation, Aˌmericaniˈsation n
Aˈmericanˌizer, Aˈmericanˌiser n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

A•mer•i•can•ize

(əˈmɛr ɪ kəˌnaɪz)

v.t., v.i. -ized, -iz•ing.
to make or become American in character; assimilate to U.S. customs and institutions.
[1790–1800, Amer.]
A•mer`i•can•i•za′tion, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Americanize


Past participle: Americanized
Gerund: Americanizing

Imperative
Americanize
Americanize
Present
I Americanize
you Americanize
he/she/it Americanizes
we Americanize
you Americanize
they Americanize
Preterite
I Americanized
you Americanized
he/she/it Americanized
we Americanized
you Americanized
they Americanized
Present Continuous
I am Americanizing
you are Americanizing
he/she/it is Americanizing
we are Americanizing
you are Americanizing
they are Americanizing
Present Perfect
I have Americanized
you have Americanized
he/she/it has Americanized
we have Americanized
you have Americanized
they have Americanized
Past Continuous
I was Americanizing
you were Americanizing
he/she/it was Americanizing
we were Americanizing
you were Americanizing
they were Americanizing
Past Perfect
I had Americanized
you had Americanized
he/she/it had Americanized
we had Americanized
you had Americanized
they had Americanized
Future
I will Americanize
you will Americanize
he/she/it will Americanize
we will Americanize
you will Americanize
they will Americanize
Future Perfect
I will have Americanized
you will have Americanized
he/she/it will have Americanized
we will have Americanized
you will have Americanized
they will have Americanized
Future Continuous
I will be Americanizing
you will be Americanizing
he/she/it will be Americanizing
we will be Americanizing
you will be Americanizing
they will be Americanizing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been Americanizing
you have been Americanizing
he/she/it has been Americanizing
we have been Americanizing
you have been Americanizing
they have been Americanizing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been Americanizing
you will have been Americanizing
he/she/it will have been Americanizing
we will have been Americanizing
you will have been Americanizing
they will have been Americanizing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been Americanizing
you had been Americanizing
he/she/it had been Americanizing
we had been Americanizing
you had been Americanizing
they had been Americanizing
Conditional
I would Americanize
you would Americanize
he/she/it would Americanize
we would Americanize
you would Americanize
they would Americanize
Past Conditional
I would have Americanized
you would have Americanized
he/she/it would have Americanized
we would have Americanized
you would have Americanized
they would have Americanized
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.Americanize - make American in character; "The year in the US has completely Americanized him"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
2.Americanize - become American in character; "After a year in Iowa, he has totally Americanized"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
amerikkalaistaa
amerikanizirati
amerikanisere

Americanize

[əˈmerɪkənaɪz] VTamericanizar
to become Americanizedamericanizarse
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Americanize

[əˈmɛrɪkəˌnaɪz] Americanise (British) vt [+ person, culture, country] → américaniser
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Americanize

visich amerikanisieren
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

americanize

[əˈmɛrɪkənaɪz] vtamericanizzare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
When Catholics started demanding state funding for their own schools to avoid having their children raised and inculcated with Protestant ideology in the common school, Protestants protested using the language of "separation of church and state." (23) One of the counterintuitive responses was from Archbishop John Ireland of Minnesota, a well-known reformer and "Americanizer," who spoke before the 1890 convention of the National Educational Association and stated that he regretted the need for a separate school system in order to provide religious education for Catholic schoolchildren.
Kellor's last stint as an Americanizer came after World War I, when she served as president of the American Association of Foreign Language Newspapers.
Historians have typically portrayed Wise as a pragmatic Americanizer intent on transforming American Jews from a dispersed group into an organized, respectable community.
If the debate surrounding ElBaradei's religiosity dies down and he becomes an official candidate who wins the 2011 elections, some Egyptians fear he will be pressured into choosing between implementing his plan of widespread democratic change and risking being labeled an "Americanizer" or an "enemy of Islam;" or compromising with the social and political elite and not following through on some of his promises, such as giving equal rights to minorities.
For example, if the debate surrounding ElBaradei's religiosity dies down and he becomes an official candidate who goes on to win the 2011 elections, some Egyptians fear that he will be pressured into choosing between implementing his plan of widespread democratic change and risking being labeled an "Americanizer" or an "enemy of Islam", or compromising with the current social and political elite and not following through on some of his promises, like giving equal rights to minorities.
Louis Harap observes, "one of the main contradictions" of Cahan's life and fiction is that "Cahan, the Americanizer of the ghetto, projected the frustrations and unhappiness that issue from Americanization" (497).
The protagonist of one of Ausubel's short stories, Yoineh Shimmel, was "King of the Knishes." A Talmud scholar and East European immigrant, the legendary Yoineh had made a fortune in the knish business and had become renowned on the Lower East Side for his culinary skills and valuable contributions as the "Americanizer of the knish." Ausubel recounted Shimmel's life story in the most glowing and reverential terms and evaluated the contemporary meaning of his knish business:
According to Pratt, the "outing" program was Carlisle's "supreme Americanizer." Based on an examination of the letters and other communications between officials at Carlisle and its former students, this program must certainly be taken into account.
(11) Absent these two pillars of Jewish life, what was there to say about second-generation Americanizers? Much scholarly and popular writing characterized the topic of Americanization as a sorry tale of declension--of selling out, as it were.
Greeley's omission of colonial history in his interpretation stems from his thesis that American Catholic history can be divided into "Americanizers" and "anti-Americanizers" (ii-13).
(12) Poly's practices, argued Harris, provided the advantage that "capital and labor [would] understand each other better if when as children they worked side by side." (13) This reflected not only Americanizers' interest in stable labor relations and avoiding class conflict, but also their acceptance of social stratification.
In Managers of Virtue (1982), David Tyack and Elisabeth Hansot argue that Progressive Era school leaders, during the period 1890-1954, were a new breed of "administrative progressives" who combined scientific expertise with business efficiency to reshape society toward "ever nobler ends." These "enthusiastic Americanizers" maintained the long-standing interest in moral and civic training shared by their predecessors.