Amerindian


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Related to Amerindian: Amerindian language, Amerindian music

Am·er·in·di·an

 (ăm′ə-rĭn′dē-ən) also Am·er·ind (ăm′ə-rĭnd′)
n.
An American Indian. See Usage Note at American Indian.


Am′er·in′di·an, Am′er·ind′ adj.
Am′er·in′dic adj.
Usage Note: The contractions Amerindian and Amerind occur infrequently in modern American English, especially with reference to the Native American peoples of the United States and Canada. They are somewhat more common in anthropological contexts or when used of the native peoples of the Caribbean and Central and South America.

Amerindian

(ˌæməˈrɪndɪən)
n, adj
1. (Peoples) a specialist word, esp in linguistics and anthropology, for American Indian
2. (Languages) a specialist word, esp in linguistics and anthropology, for American Indian
ˌAmerˈindic adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Amerindian - any member of the peoples living in North or South America before the Europeans arrivedAmerindian - any member of the peoples living in North or South America before the Europeans arrived
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
war party - a band of warriors who raid or fight an enemy (used especially of Native Americans)
person of color, person of colour - (formal) any non-European non-white person
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
South American Indian - a member of a native Indian group in South America
Carib, Carib Indian - a member of an American Indian peoples of northeastern South America and the Lesser Antilles
Arawak, Arawakan - a member of a widespread group of Amerindians living in northeastern South America
Translations

Amerindian

[ˌæməˈrɪndɪən]
A. ADJamerindio
B. Namerindio/a m/f

Amerindian

nIndianer(in) m(f)
adjindianisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing on fieldwork from diverse Amerindian societies whose lives and worlds are undergoing processes of transformation, adaptation, and deterioration, this volume offers new insights into the indigenous constitutions of humanity, personhood, and environment characteristic of the South American highlands and lowlands.
Stephen became the first Amerindian to contest the General Elections in British Guiana, and at the age of 60, he became the first Amerindian Member of Parliament in Guyanese history, when he was elected onto the Legislative Council of British Guiana on September 10 1957.
He notes that there are three major avenues of influence on American ideas about reincarnation--those stemming from Amerindian cultures, those imported in religious and occult traditions, and those derived from "direct participatory knowledge [i.e., past-life memory] taken as evidential basis for such belief" (p.
Generally, researchers attributed an Amerindian affiliation to sites with ceramics and a range of lifhic materials, and an Inuit affiliation to sites with winter houses and diagnostic bone and lithic artifacts.
Ethnic groups: mestizo (Amerindian-Spanish) 62%, predominantly Amerindian 21%, Amerindian 7%, other 10% (mostly European)
Numerous Amerindian groups call this land home, including the Makushi, Wapishana, Waiwai, and Patamona peoples.
Instead, the author crafts an image of policy mired in bureaucracy, misguided British military leaders, a talented--if outnumbered--French military, and intimidating French-allied "Amerindian" forces.
The main idea put forth here is that contrasting modes of creativity exist between lowland Amerindian poetics and fundamental presumptions of Euro-American literary modes of composition.
Drawing on George SiouiAEs Amerindian Autohistory, author Susan M.
Amerindian land use has therefore been mainly long-fallow rotational agriculture able to sustain only small communities that follow a semi-nomadic existence (Hills 1968).
One of the strongest impressions I take away from the book has to be the extremely powerful value and status attributed to literacy and numeracy, not only as markers of difference between Amerindian and European, but also as deliberative techniques for determining and maintaining the modernist supremacy of our planet.
These texts provide fresh information and perspectives on the very complex story of the conquest and the transmission, reception, and appropriation of the Christian religion in Latin America, particularly the encounters and interplay with Amerindian traditions.