Amerindian

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Related to Amerindians: Caribs

Am·er·in·di·an

 (ăm′ə-rĭn′dē-ən) also Am·er·ind (ăm′ə-rĭnd′)
n.
An American Indian. See Usage Note at American Indian.


Am′er·in′di·an, Am′er·ind′ adj.
Am′er·in′dic adj.
Usage Note: The contractions Amerindian and Amerind occur infrequently in modern American English, especially with reference to the Native American peoples of the United States and Canada. They are somewhat more common in anthropological contexts or when used of the native peoples of the Caribbean and Central and South America.

Amerindian

(ˌæməˈrɪndɪən)
n, adj
1. (Peoples) a specialist word, esp in linguistics and anthropology, for American Indian
2. (Languages) a specialist word, esp in linguistics and anthropology, for American Indian
ˌAmerˈindic adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Amerindian - any member of the peoples living in North or South America before the Europeans arrivedAmerindian - any member of the peoples living in North or South America before the Europeans arrived
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
war party - a band of warriors who raid or fight an enemy (used especially of Native Americans)
person of color, person of colour - (formal) any non-European non-white person
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
South American Indian - a member of a native Indian group in South America
Carib, Carib Indian - a member of an American Indian peoples of northeastern South America and the Lesser Antilles
Arawak, Arawakan - a member of a widespread group of Amerindians living in northeastern South America
Translations

Amerindian

[ˌæməˈrɪndɪən]
A. ADJamerindio
B. Namerindio/a m/f

Amerindian

nIndianer(in) m(f)
adjindianisch
References in periodicals archive ?
The Amerindians use Duranta as an insecticide, vermifuge, and interestingly, as a molluscicide.
Meanwhile, Stephen Campbells interest in politics was aroused when he worked at the Waini sawmill where Amerindians and other sections of the Guyanese population were seeking representation.
Despite the hearths' stratigraphic position within the Basque cultural level, Tuck cast doubt on the simultaneous presence of Amerindians and whalers.
Guyana is the kind of place where anteaters and jaguars amble across the road, where Amerindians still follow the rhythms of the land, where you can sidle up to the very edge of a 740-foot waterfall and peer into the abyss.
The villagers are all Allicock Amerindians and live a nine-hour drive from the capital Georgetown.
Moises Castillo has pointed out the ambiguity with which the Amerindians were portrayed in early modern Spanish theater; he notes that the Amerindian can be cast as honorable or barbaric, but that at all times these characters are constructs or a "sintoma de la ideologia imperial del XVII" (1).
The consequences of State claims to, and controls over, the territories of Guyana's Indigenous Peoples (Amerindians) are traced through successive Dutch and British colonial to post-Independence governments.
It began with the encounter between Europeans and Amerindians, which quickly left the Amerindians exterminated, he says, and continued with the plantation slavery of the colonial era.
They are shy, and fished a lot by the jungle tribes of Amerindians that rarely get seen by outsiders.
Chapter one examines missionary and conversion efforts among Amerindians in seventeenth-century North America, from the first (unsuccessful) English effort to employ native evangelists in early seventeenth-century Virginia to the mid-seventeenth century "praying towns" of eastern Massachusetts and southern New England.
The topics of this collection engage: African Diasporas in the Mediterranean world, the Africanization of Amerindians in the Greater Caribbean via the Wayuu and Miskito, African nations as diasporic institution-building in the Iberian Atlantic, Caribbean identities and dance, articulations of Blackness in Toronto during the 1970s, Black solidarity and inter-ethnic intersections in the U.S., the Caribbean Diaspora and Black internationalism, and Black Power in the African Diaspora.