Ames test

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Ames test

n.
A test used to determine the mutagenic potential of a substance, in which salmonella bacteria that are unable to synthesize histidine are introduced into the substance, and the substance is deemed mutagenic and carcinogenic if the bacteria regain the ability to synthesize histidine.

[After Bruce Ames (born 1928), American biochemist.]

Ames test

(eɪmz)
n
(Biochemistry) a method of preliminary screening for carcinogens, based on their ability to cause mutations in bacteria
[named after Bruce Ames (born 1928), US biochemist who invented the test]

Ames′ test`

(eɪmz)
n.
a test that exposes a strain of bacteria to a chemical compound in order to determine the potential of the compound for causing cancer.
[1975–80; after Bruce N. Ames (born 1928), U.S. biochemist, who developed the test]
References in periodicals archive ?
The most widely employed and acknowledged assay to evaluate genotoxicity is the Ames assay, which detects mutagenicity in a bacterial reverse gene mutation test.
Key words: Antimutagenicity, dibenzoylmethane, cooked food mutagens, Ames assay
Citrus fruits, for example, contain certain chemicals that appear carcinogenic in the Ames assay, but an assessment of epidemiologic studies led a National Research Council committee to conclude last March that these fruits may actually help protect people from stomach cancer.