Ames test


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Ames test

n.
A test used to determine the mutagenic potential of a substance, in which salmonella bacteria that are unable to synthesize histidine are introduced into the substance, and the substance is deemed mutagenic and carcinogenic if the bacteria regain the ability to synthesize histidine.

[After Bruce Ames (born 1928), American biochemist.]

Ames test

(eɪmz)
n
(Biochemistry) a method of preliminary screening for carcinogens, based on their ability to cause mutations in bacteria
[named after Bruce Ames (born 1928), US biochemist who invented the test]

Ames′ test`

(eɪmz)
n.
a test that exposes a strain of bacteria to a chemical compound in order to determine the potential of the compound for causing cancer.
[1975–80; after Bruce N. Ames (born 1928), U.S. biochemist, who developed the test]
References in periodicals archive ?
If an Ames test is conducted, the second study in the tier should evaluate the hazard potential to mammalian cells.
GLP genetic toxicity testing involves Ames test (regulatory version) [with and without metabolic activation to detect base pair and frame shit mutations]; in vitro micronucleus (regulatory version) [with and without metabolic activation to detect chromosomal breaks and aneuploidy]; in vivo rat bone marrow micronucleus test [for the detection of chromosomal breaks and aneuploidy].
The Ames test was specifically designed to detect a wide range of mutagenic chemicals.
Ames test on back mutation action of the strain using both TA98 and TA100 strains showed negative results.
While the statistical evaluation of the results of the Ames test is under discussion (Kim and Margolin, 1999; Mortelmans and Zeiger, 2000) and depends also from the historical data achieved in the individual testing site, the responsible laboratory considered a test item showing a positive response, if the number of revertants was significantly increased (p < 0.
Ames (University of California-Berkeley) for inventing the Ames test of mutagenicity
The mutagenic activity of water extracts and MX were determined by means of the Ames test (Maron & Ames, 1983), using two strains (TA98 and TA100) of Salmonella typhimurium, with metabolic activity (with mixture S9, made from a fraction of rat liver homogenate) and without metabolic activity (without mixture S9) to detect indirect mutagenic activity.
The purpose of this research was to determine the mutagenic potential of the Cauca River waters in the urban zone of the city of Cali by using the well known Ames test, and also identify and quantify some of the most dangerous pollutants such as pesticides and heavy metals.
Because no single test can predict the potential genotoxicity of a compound, we aimed to shed light on this issue using two bacterial standard assays: SOS-Inductest (prophage [lambda] induction) and Ames test (reverse mutation).
Genotoxicity of hazardous leachates from solid wastes evaluated for environmental impact with the Ames test.
The current International Conference of Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) recommends a battery of tests for the registration of pharmaceuticals, requiring an assessment of mutagenicity in a bacterium, such as the Ames test, plus an in vitro test with cytogenetic evaluation of chromosomal damage in mammalian cells, such as the micronucleus test or an assessment of mutagenicity in mammalian cells, such as the mouse lymphoma assay.