amicus curiae

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a·mi·cus cu·ri·ae

 (ə-mē′kəs kyo͝or′ē-ī′)
n. pl. a·mi·ci curiae (ə-mē′kē)
A party that is not involved in a particular litigation but that is allowed by the court to advise it on a matter of law or policy directly affecting the litigation.

[Latin amīcus cūriae : amīcus, friend + cūriae, genitive of cūria, court.]

amicus curiae

(æˈmiːkʊs ˈkjʊərɪˌiː)
n, pl amici curiae (æˈmiːkaɪ)
(Law) law a person not directly engaged in a case who advises the court
[Latin, literally: friend of the court]

a•mi•cus cu•ri•ae

(əˈmaɪ kəs ˈkyʊər iˌi, əˈmi kəsˈkyʊər iˌaɪ)

n., pl. a•mi•ci cu•ri•ae (əˈmaɪ kaɪ ˈkyʊər iˌi, əˈmi ki ˈkyʊər iˌaɪ)
a person, not a party to the litigation, who advises the court on some matter before it.
[1605–15; < New Latin: friend of the court]

amicus curiae

A Latin phrase meaning friend of the court, used to mean a person who advises a court but is not involved in the particular litigation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amicus curiae - an adviser to the court on some matter of law who is not a party to the caseamicus curiae - an adviser to the court on some matter of law who is not a party to the case; usually someone who wants to influence the outcome of a lawsuit involving matters of wide public interest
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
adviser, advisor, consultant - an expert who gives advice; "an adviser helped students select their courses"; "the United States sent military advisors to Guatemala"