Amitabha

(redirected from Amida Buddha)

Amitabha

(ˌamiˈtɑbə)
n
(Buddhism) Buddhism (in Pure Land sects) a Bodhisattva who presides over a Pure Land in the west of the universe. Japanese name: Amida
[Sanskrit, literally: immeasurable light, from amita infinite + ābhā light]
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Eshin Sozu, also known as Genshin (942-1017), remains an influential monk and philosopher who promoted a doctrine of devotion to the celestial Amida Buddha, and whose writings on rebirth and salvation through faith stressed the importance of visualising this buddha.
The original story was of two entertainers in 12th-century Japan, Gio and Hotoke, treated poorly by their patron and lover, leaving him to become Buddhist nuns and being reborn in Amida Buddha's Western paradise, says Stoppoli.
Extending from the foundational texts and first interpreters in the 4th century, to Rennyo in the 15th century, Professor Bloom's selections trace the development of Shin Buddhist teaching from monastic visualization practices to the widely popular path to salvation through faith in, and recitation of, the name of Amida Buddha. Volume 2 features a foreword by Kenneth K.
The Pure Land teachings are founded on the myriad interpretations of Amida Buddha's controversial eighteenth vow, which asserts that anyone who faithfully recites Amida Buddha's name a minimum of ten times before death will be guaranteed rebirth in the Pure Land, a heaven-like place where one is freed from the wheels of rebirth, regardless of past karma or bad behavior in one's present life.
Hence, Honen taught that people should hope for rebirth in the "Pure Land" by relying on the power of Amida Buddha. This means that instead of relying on their own efforts, they should rely on Amida's "other-power" (ta-riki) for salvation.
The chapter refers to the book to supply the missing connections; key terms and names introduced in this chapter include karmic affinity, nembutsu, butsudan, Shinran, Amida Buddha, mappo, andjiriki/tariki.
Obaku Zen's appeal to the laity was a source of irritation because Obaku Zen accommodated Pure Land Buddhism's sutras and the practice of nembutsu [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], the chanting of Amida Buddha's name.
Therefore, in his view, manas-vjana means the MMNMP, and the great compassionate vow of Amida Buddha, the so-called Other Power that breaks the MMNMP and cultivates the Buddha nature in alaya.
Pye (formerly Religionwissenschaft, Marburg U., Germany) presents this publication covering Buddhist meditation, specifically the practice of calling on the name of Amida Buddha, a practice which has become a core element to Buddhist meditation and spirituality.
Especially striking are her paintings in the series, Requiem for an Executed Bird, The Forest of Amida Buddha, Fathom, and the like.
Higashibaba notes that the concept of one supreme divinity was already familiar to the Japanese in the existence of Amida Buddha of Pure Land.