Amidah


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Amidah

(amiˈdaː; aˈmidə)
n
(Judaism) Judaism the central prayer in each of the daily services, recited silently and standing. Also called: Shemona Esrei
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References in periodicals archive ?
A grace or prayer is spoken after the meal, known as "Birkat Hamazon" and a silent prayer called "Amidah" might also be offered on the occasion.
[5] Sitti Nurani Sirajuddin, Siti Nurlaelah, Amidah Amrawaty, Amrullah T, St.
Krakov haYehudit 1939-1943: Amidah, mahteret, ma'avak.
For example, certain morning prayers cannot take place until after sunrise, such as putting on tefillin and the silent Amidah, or Shemona Esrei.
Among the topics are aspects of the Jewish contribution to biblical interpretation, Psalm 93: a historical and comparative survey of its Jewish interpretation, how early Judaism understood the concept of 'avodah, the function of history in early rabbinic liturgy, and the 'amidah benediction on forgiveness: links between its theology and its textual evolution.
At this point in the Amidah, I'll allow you a few private moments of contemplative prayer.
The Rabbis were fully aware of the breadth and complexity of the term da 'at as can be seen in the text of the blessing for da'at in the daily amidah prayer.
The Kedushah, or third blessing of the Amidah, the Shabbat's central prayer, concludes with "Hallelujah" spoken by the entire congregation.
Irving Berlin's "God Bless America" has moments when it sounds like the beginning of the Amidah, the standing prayer in Jewish service.
But it became real only when I heard people saying to each other, "The rabbi is teaching us how to be a real community, to support each other and our children, to cherish our Jewishness, to work for peace and tikkun olam." I became real as I realized I was achieving my goal from the prayer after the Amidah: "Nafthik'afar lakol tihiyeh"--may my soul be as dust to everyone (Berachot 17a).
"God of Me: Imagining God throughout Your Lifetime" discusses how the search for God is a lifetime endeavor, as Rabbi David Lyon speaks plainly and clearly on how in Jewish worship, it all starts with the central prayer of Amidah, urging readers to clear their mind of what they think God should be and search deeper for a clearer picture.