transaminase

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Related to Aminotransferases: aspartate aminotransferase, Transaminases

trans·am·i·nase

 (trăns-ăm′ə-nās′, -nāz′, trănz-)
n.
Any of a group of enzymes that catalyze transamination. Also called aminotransferase.

transaminase

(trænzˈæmɪˌneɪz; -ˌneɪs)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem an enzyme that catalyses the transfer of an amino group from one molecule, esp an amino acid, to another, esp a keto acid, in the process of transamination

trans•am•i•nase

(trænsˈæm əˌneɪs, -ˌneɪz, trænz-)

n.
any of a class of enzymes that conduct transamination.
[1940–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transaminase - a class of transferases that catalyze transamination (that transfer an amino group from an amino acid to another compound)
transferase - any of various enzymes that move a chemical group from one compound to another compound
Translations

transaminase

n transaminasa
References in periodicals archive ?
Chronological development of elevated aminotransferases in a nonalcoholic population.
Compared with 758 IRAS subjects who did not develop type 2 diabetes, both of the aminotransferases were associated with a significantly elevated risk for the development of diabetes--with odds ratios of 1.
In the Letairis full prescribing information, for all Letairis-treated patients (n=483), the 12-week incidence of aminotransferases greater than three times ULN was 0.
A high precirrhosis body mass index, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and normal levels of aminotransferases were far more likely to accompany cryptogenic cirrhosis than to be seen among 115 controls with hepatocellular carcinoma associated with alcoholic or viral cirrhosis (Gastroenterology 123[7]:134-40, 2002).
3 percent) placebo patients had liver aminotransferases (ALT or AST) elevations greater than three times the upper limit of normal (ULN) compared to zero patients in the ambrisentan group.
Elevations of liver aminotransferases have been reported with Letairis and serious liver injury has been reported with related drugs.
In the United States, Hepsera is indicated for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in adults with evidence of active viral replication and either evidence of persistent elevations in serum aminotransferases (ALT or AST) or histologically active disease.
Food and Drug Administration approved Hepsera for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in adults with evidence of active viral replication and either evidence of persistent elevations in serum aminotransferases (ALT or AST) or histologically active disease.
Serum aminotransferases AST and ALT was measured at 340 nm using colorimetric method described by Reitman and Frankel.
Presently a debate is going on whether to lower the normal range of aminotransferases to accommodate the changing lifestyle factors that affect aminotransferase concentrations, especially obesity, which would increase the detection of Hepatitis C and fatty liver disease2,8.
Physical activity is also associated with an improvement in blood levels of aminotransferases and is particularly beneficial in patients presenting with severe obesity at baseline.
Liver function tests showed increased levels of aminotransferases in all our 98 cases (Table -3).