transaminase

(redirected from Aminotransferases)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Aminotransferases: aspartate aminotransferase, Transaminases

trans·am·i·nase

 (trăns-ăm′ə-nās′, -nāz′, trănz-)
n.
Any of a group of enzymes that catalyze transamination. Also called aminotransferase.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

transaminase

(trænzˈæmɪˌneɪz; -ˌneɪs)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem an enzyme that catalyses the transfer of an amino group from one molecule, esp an amino acid, to another, esp a keto acid, in the process of transamination
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trans•am•i•nase

(trænsˈæm əˌneɪs, -ˌneɪz, trænz-)

n.
any of a class of enzymes that conduct transamination.
[1940–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.transaminase - a class of transferases that catalyze transamination (that transfer an amino group from an amino acid to another compound)
transferase - any of various enzymes that move a chemical group from one compound to another compound
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

transaminase

n transaminasa
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, a pathologist might see a positive antinuclear antibody and 3 plasma cells in a portal tract somewhere in the liver biopsy from one of these asymptomatic patients with elevated transaminases, and reason that because autoimmune hepatitis also has plasma cells and autoantibodies with elevated aminotransferases, the possibility of autoimmune hepatitis should be raised in a comment.
In subjects with NAFLD reduced insulin sensitivity was observed not on muscles level but at the level of liver and adiposetissue.15 This study described the elevated aminotransferases with higher BMI value which support previous study results raised serum ALT in subjects of type 2 diabetes, about 80% of the subjects were obese with greater BMI by Shahid A et al.16
It is well known that prolonged elevation of aminotransferases (ATs) is often suggestive of acute and chronic hepatic diseases (1).
Several parameters, such as the gender, age, geographic place of living, treatment allocation, HBV DNA viral load (VL), and liver damage (as measured by aspartate (ASAT) and alanine (ALAT) aminotransferases serum levels) were analyzed.
Aminotransferases, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), are widely used in evaluating liver status because of high diagnostic accuracy and low test costs [18].
In 2 patients with DON and a past medical history of viral hepatitis B, the level of aminotransferases was within the normal range before and during therapy.
Serum aminotransferases AST and ALT was measured at 340 nm using colorimetric method described by Reitman and Frankel.
Initial lab findings were significant for an elevation in aminotransferases (ALT 3510 U/L, AST 9378 U/L) (Figures 1 and 2).
Presently a debate is going on whether to lower the normal range of aminotransferases to accommodate the changing lifestyle factors that affect aminotransferase concentrations, especially obesity, which would increase the detection of Hepatitis C and fatty liver disease2,8.
In view of multiplicity and complexity of the liver functions, a battery of liver function tests (LFTs) are employed for accurate diagnosis, which include the aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, albumin, and prothrombin time.
Blood analyses showed increased levels of aminotransferases, thrombocytopenia (69,000 platelets/ [micro]L), and mild anemia (hemoglobin level 94 g/L [reference range 130 g/L-160 g/L]).