ampere

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Related to Amperes: resistance, voltage, Volts, Ampere's law

am·pere

 (ăm′pîr′)
n. Abbr. A
The basic unit of electric current, equal to one coulomb per second and equivalent to the current, flowing in two straight parallel wires of negligible cross section separated by a distance of one meter, that produces a force between the wires of 2.0 × 10-7 newtons per meter of length. The value of an ampere in the International System differs very slightly from that in the meter-kilogram-second-ampere system of units. See Table at measurement.

[After André Marie Ampère.]

Ampère

(ˈæmpɛə; French ɑ̃pɛr)
n
(Biography) André Marie (ɑ̃dre mari). 1775–1836, French physicist and mathematician, who made major discoveries in the fields of magnetism and electricity

ampere

(ˈæmpɛə)
n
1. (Units) the basic SI unit of electric current; the constant current that, when maintained in two parallel conductors of infinite length and negligible cross section placed 1 metre apart in free space, produces a force of 2 × 10–7 newton per metre between them. 1 ampere is equivalent to 1 coulomb per second
2. (Units) a former unit of electric current (international ampere); the current that, when passed through a solution of silver nitrate, deposits silver at the rate of 0.001118 gram per second. 1 international ampere equals 0.999835 ampere
Abbreviation: amp Symbol: A
[C19: named after André Marie Ampère]

am•pere

(ˈæm pɪər, æmˈpɪər)

n.
the SI unit of electrical current, equal to a constant current that would produce a force of 2 x 10−7 newton per meter of length when maintained in two straight parallel conductors of infinite length and negligible circular cross section and placed one meter apart in a vacuum. Abbr.: A, amp.
[1881; after A. M. Ampère]

Am•père

(ˈæm pɪər, æmˈpɪər, Fr. ɑ̃ˈpɛr)

n.
André Marie, 1775–1836, French physicist.

am·pere

(ăm′pîr′)
A unit used to measure electric current. Electric current is measured by how great a charge passes a given point in a second. One ampere is equal to a flow of one coulomb per second.

ampere

1. The unit of electric current in the international system.
2. (A) The unit for measuring electric current.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ampere - a former unit of electric current (slightly smaller than the SI ampere)ampere - a former unit of electric current (slightly smaller than the SI ampere)
current unit - a measure of the amount of electric charge flowing past a circuit point at a specific time
2.ampere - the basic unit of electric current adopted under the Systeme International d'Unitesampere - the basic unit of electric current adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites; "a typical household circuit carries 15 to 50 amps"
current unit - a measure of the amount of electric charge flowing past a circuit point at a specific time
milliampere, mA - one thousandth of an ampere
abamp, abampere - a unit of current equal to 10 amperes
Translations
ampér
ampere
amper
ampeeri
amper
amper
amper
アンペア
amper
ampér
amper
ampere

ampere

ampère [ˈæmpɛəʳ]
A. Namperio m
B. CPD ampere-hour Namperio-hora m

ampere

ampère [ˈæmpɛər] (British) nampère m

ampère

(ˈӕmpeə) noun
(also amp (ӕmp) ) (often abbreviated to A when written) the unit by which an electric current is measured.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for controller, ejector, pneumatic, solid state, adjustable time delayed program, 115 volts ac, 60hz, isolated solid state contact ouput (triac), four amperes maximum continous at 140 degrees farenheit, eight amperes maximum continous at 72 degrees farenheit, 25 amperes maximum inrush current.
This is in addition to 26 transmitters with a capacity of 175 megavolt amperes, at a cost of $39m, and EGP 24m in local components, plus 12 transmitters with 125 megavolt amperes worth $12m, and EGP 8m in local components.
5 amperes (DC), thanks to improved chip technologies.
29, the latest prices were LL240 per hour for 5 amperes, and LL480 for 10 amperes.
It's more than a cellphone, sure, but it's far less than a single (non-LED) nay light, which consumes approximately 25 watts of power, or two amperes at 14 volts.
Marking and cutting can also be undertaken with the same power source - for example, marking from 12 amperes and cutting with up to 720 amperes.
The output is set at 3600 mega amperes in this stage.
Present HIF power plant concepts require, 50-100 Amperes of beam current arranged in multiple beam channels of about 0.
It offers contact current ratings of 20 amperes continuous for size 16 contacts.
Flipping one bit, for instance, requires the equivalent of 5 million amperes of current per square centimeter.
They distribute up to a total of 300 amperes of load current from a single source.
Many of these supplies are capable of producing 200 or more amperes of current.