amphictyon


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amphictyon

(æmˈfɪktɪən)
n
(Historical Terms) a delegate to an amphictyonic council
[C16: back formation from amphictyons, from Greek amphiktiones neighbours, from amphi- + ktizein to found]
References in classic literature ?
Amphictyon, we are told, was the author of that which bore his name.
The Amphictyons were the guardians of religion, and of the immense riches belonging to the temple of Delphos, where they had the right of jurisdiction in controversies between the inhabitants and those who came to consult the oracle.
The Amphictyons had in their hands the superstition of the times, one of the principal engines by which government was then maintained; they had a declared authority to use coercion against refractory cities, and were bound by oath to exert this authority on the necessary occasions.
The Thebans, with others of the cities, undertook to maintain the authority of the Amphictyons, and to avenge the violated god.
No," replied Grandfather; "the different colonies did not compose one nation together; it was merely a confederacy among the governments: It somewhat resembled the league of the Amphictyons, which you remember in Grecian history.
Amphictyon, Letter to the Editor, Essay I, RICHMOND ENQUIRER, Mar.
In Hampden (Roane), the Chief Justice recognized a bold and formidable opponent who went far beyond Amphictyon in impeaching the integrity and legitimacy of the judiciary department.
187) In his essays, Amphictyon accused the Chief Justice of having adopted a "liberal and latitudinous construction" of the Necessary and Proper Clause: (188) "[S]o wide is the latitude given to the words 'general welfare,' in one of these clauses, and to the word 'necessary' in the other, that it will, (if the construction be persisted in) really become a government of almost unlimited powers.
According to the myth, Amphictyon, son of Deucalion and Pyrrah, ordered the wine mixed with water at meetings of his councilors to dilute its strength and therefore cut down on drunkenness and quarrels.
The essays of Amphictyon, Hampden, A Friend of the Constitution, and a Friend to the Union are reprinted in GERALD GUNTHER, JOHN MARSHALL'S DEFENSE OF MCCULLOCH V.
Indeed, rather than the invention of Cruce or Sully, the idea of an assembly belongs to the amphictyons, who either considered the election of delegates through popular vote or limited themselves to bringing together properly credentialed ambassadors.
In Pausanias' own day there were thirty Amphictyons and the Ainians are not specifically mentioned as separate from the Thessalians.