Amphion


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Am·phi·on

 (ăm-fī′ən)
n. Greek Mythology
The son of Zeus and the twin brother of Zethus, with whom he built a wall around Thebes by charming the stones into place with the music of his magical lyre.

Am•phi•on

(æmˈfaɪ ən, ˈæm fi-)

n.
(in Greek myth) a son of Zeus and a mortal woman, who with his twin brother Zethus built the walls of Thebes by charming the stones into place with his lyre.
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References in classic literature ?
The whistle of the locomotive, more powerful than Amphion's lyre, was about to bid them rise from American soil.
"Next to her I saw Antiope, daughter to Asopus, who could boast of having slept in the arms of even Jove himself, and who bore him two sons Amphion and Zethus.
She was youngest daughter to Amphion son of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.
Orpheus and Amphion went a little farther, and by the charms of music enchanted things merely inanimate.
Out of dust to build What is more than dust,-- Walls Amphion piled Phoebus stablish must.
5.6.2: Hesiod says that (the children of Amphion and Niobe) were ten sons and ten daughters.
MESSENGER Attend all ye who dwell beside the halls Of Cadmus and Amphion. No man's life As of one tenor would I praise or blame, For Fortune with a constant ebb and rise Casts down and raises high and low alike, And none can read a mortal's horoscope.
The chosen men of the Athenians were in the van, led by Menestheus son of Peteos, with whom were also Pheidas, Stichius, and stalwart Bias; Meges son of Phyleus, Amphion, and Dracius commanded the Epeans, while Medon and staunch Podarces led the men of Phthia.
Those suspended are life sciences investor Amphion Innovations PLC, IT services provider IDE Group Holdings PLC, pallet maker RM2 International SA, and cybersecurity firm Defenx PLC.
Works concession: development concession for the port village of amphion
He was 19, working as a Royal Navy stoker on board HMS Amphion when the ship was sunk by a mine just 32 hours after war was declared.
(31) For example, Sir Philip Sidney in "The Defense of Poesy" makes reference to the oratorcivilizer myth, and calls Orpheus and Amphion people who "draw with their charming sweetness the wild untamed wits to an admiration of knowledge." For the civic function of rhetoric in the Renaissance, see Brian Vickers, "'The Power of Persuasion': Images of the Orator, Elyot to Shakespeare," in Renaissance Eloquence: Studies in the Theory and Practice of Renaissance Rhetoric, ed.