amylase

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Related to Amylases: Lipases, pectinases, Proteases, Cellulases

am·y·lase

 (ăm′ə-lās′, -lāz′)
n.
Any of a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of starch to sugars. In humans, amylases are produced in the salivary glands and the pancreas.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

amylase

(ˈæmɪˌleɪz)
n
(Biochemistry) any of several enzymes that hydrolyse starch and glycogen to simple sugars, such as glucose. They are present in saliva
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

am•yl•ase

(ˈæm əˌleɪs, -ˌleɪz)

n.
any of several digestive enzymes that break down starches.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

am·y·lase

(ăm′ə-lās′)
Any of various enzymes that break down starches into their component sugars, such as glucose. Amylase is present in fluid secreted by the pancreas, in saliva in some mammals, and in plants.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amylase - any of a group of proteins found in saliva and pancreatic juice and parts of plantsamylase - any of a group of proteins found in saliva and pancreatic juice and parts of plants; help convert starch to sugar
enzyme - any of several complex proteins that are produced by cells and act as catalysts in specific biochemical reactions
ptyalin - an amylase secreted in saliva
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
amyláza
amylase
Amylase
amelazo
amülaas
amylaasi
amylase
עמילאז
アミラーゼ
amylase
amylase
amylaza
amylas
амілаза

amylase

[ˈæmɪˌleɪz] namilasi f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

amylase

n amilasa
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alpha amylases ([alpha]-amylases) ([alpha]-1,4-glucanohydrolase; E.C 3.2.1.1), are endohydrolases that catalyze hydrolysis of starch at [alpha]-1,4-glycosidic linkages and yield monomers of glucose, maltose and oligosaccharides (Omemum et al., 2005; Bhanja et al., 2007: Leman et al., 2009).
To best of our knowledge this is the highest activity among the reported recombinant amylases from genus Geobacillus.
Microbial sources of amylases are preferred because of several reasons like easy cultivation, genetic manipulation, better strain selection and optimization of culture conditions for enhanced production of amylases (Konsoula and Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, 2007).
Amylases are ubiquitous enzymes found in prokaryotes, plants, animals, fungi and unicellular eukaryotes (Zaferanloo, Bhattacharjee, Ghorbani, Mahon, & Palombo, 2014).
The aim of the present study is the characterization of some thermophilic bacteria isolated from hot springs in Jazan, KSA in addition to the investigation of the optimum conditions for amylases and proteases production.
(2011) Production of alpha amylases by Aspergillus niger using cheaper substrates employing solid state fermentation.
With regard to industrial applications, enzyme purification studies have predominantly focused on proteases, lipases, and amylases [4-12].
Even though its extensive applications in industries, amylases obtained from mesophilic organisms failed to cope up with the industrial processes that are carried out in the presence of salt solutions, organic solvents, heavy metals, high temperature and extremes of pH that would be inhibit the enzymatic activity (Saxena et al., 2007).
Amylases are one of the most widely used commercial enzymes whose range of application has broadened in numerous areas such as food, medicinal, clinical and analytical chemistry.