An Lu Shan

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An Lu Shan

(æn luː ʃæn)
n
(Biography) 703–57 ad, Chinese military governor. He declared himself emperor (756) and seized the capital Chang An; murdered by a eunuch slave
References in periodicals archive ?
Yan composed the piece to honor his nephew, Yan Jiming, who had died during the rebellion of An Lushan in Hebei province in 756.
During the period of imperial reconstruction after the An Lushan Rebellion (755-763), he argues, geographical advancements and literary imaging joined forces to capture a radically changing world and to give that world new meaning.
Du Fu also witnessed the good times end when, in 755, a devastating rebellion lead by General An Lushan plunged the Empire into eight years of bloody civil turmoil.
In the fourth chapter, the author argues that capital elites also adapted well to changes in the bureaucratic structures of provincial administration instituted in the aftermath of the An Lushan Rebellion.
In the next chapter, Tackett walks us through epigraphic evidence that revises our understanding of provincial bureaucracies before and after the An Lushan rebellion (755-762).
As one of Du Fu's contemporaries who experienced the An Lushan Rebellion (755-763), Wang was forced (?) to accept an official post at the court of An Lushan at the time when the rebels occupied Chang'an.
Severel conflicts of the distant past took a proportionately greater toll on the global population than the world wars, including the Mongol conquests of the 13th century and the An Lushan Revolt in the eighth century during China's Tang dynasty, in which 36 million people (two-thirds of the Chinese Empire's population) died.
Employed by the Tang government during the An Lushan Rebellion (755-783), Shenhui was able to sell his lineage along with the ordination certificates he was hawking to refill the state's coffers.
In 755 An Lushan rebelled against the Tang dynasty and the Chinese empire disintegrated.
To prevent the reoccurence of the disastrous An Lushan rebellion of 755, when a powerful border general nearly toppled the mighty Tang dynasty (618--907), [92] Ming rulers chose to concentrate a very large proportion of their forces close to the capital, where presumably they would be under closer supervision and tighter control.
During the 750s he held several assignments in the Central Asian outposts of the far-flung Tang empire until the eruption of the An Lushan Rebellion of 755 forced him to return to China.