Anancy

Anancy

(əˈnænsɪ) or

Anansi

n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a character in Caribbean folklore, a cunning trickster generally depicted as a spider with a human head; the subject of many Anancy stories, the character has its origins among the Ashanti of W Africa
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Nancy stories are part of the heritage of Caribbean oral tradition, stories told from one generation to the next to expose human vices such as greed, obsession with power, and selfishness; the structural irony of these narratives evokes bursts of laughter from the audience as the exploits of Anancy, the rascal hero, are applauded, bursts of laughter marking significant moments of self-recognition in the audience; while nancy stories relentlessly expose the ugly tendencies in humans, fairy tales suggest that the ugliness is not natural to humans and is an aberration in some that is counteracted by noble humans who fight to protect the weak.
(9) In Jamaican patois, to be "trickified" is to be cunning and deceptive, like Anancy, the trickster folk hero.
The chapter concludes with an analysis of Anancy stories, West African animal trickster tales that "teach survival in conditions of systematized oppression" (p.
Asi se percibe la presencia, en paises distantes entre si, de expresiones hermanadas o parientas del oriki, del alabao, del guali, del bullerengue, de los bailes cantados, del abozao, de la zamacueca, de la marinera, del lando, de la arana Anancy, del candomble, del candombe, de la santeria, de los orichas.
The main character of some of these stories is Anancy, a spider trickster who sometimes takes on human form.
In so doing, he is obliquely drawing out the ways that marronage instigates a reconnection to diasporic African cultural elements like Yoruban deities (vodou) and mischievous Anancy stories (oral storytelling).
Lacing Caribbean folklore (Anancy stories, cowhoofed obeahs, beautiful soucouyants) and biblical allusions into the work, Yanique produces fiction we might call 'realist mythology.'" WALTON MUYUMBA
Yeats, "The Yes Yes Second Coming" Joseph Conrad Heart of Darkness Wole Soyinka Death and the King's Death and the King's Horseman Horseman Birago Diop "The Bone"; "Mother Omitted; orature Crocodile" represented by one-page Ghanian Anancy tale Bernard Dadie "The Mirror of Omitted; orature Dearth"; "The Black represented by one-page Cloth"; "The Hunter Ghanian Anancy tale and the Boa" Leopold Senghor 9 Poems 8 Poems Doris Lessing "The Old Chief "The Old Chief Mshlanga" Mshlanga" Additions in the third edition include numerous short stories and one set of poems.