anarchism

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Related to Anarchist politics: anarchy

an·ar·chism

 (ăn′ər-kĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory or doctrine that all forms of government are oppressive and undesirable and should be abolished.
2. Active resistance and terrorism against the state, as used by some anarchists.
3. Rejection of all forms of coercive control and authority: "He was inclined to anarchism; he hated system and organization and uniformity" (Bertrand Russell).

an′ar·chist (-kĭst) n.
an′ar·chis′tic (-kĭs′tĭk) adj.

anarchism

(ˈænəˌkɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) political theory a doctrine advocating the abolition of government
2. the principles or practice of anarchists

an•ar•chism

(ˈæn ərˌkɪz əm)

n.
1. a doctrine urging the abolition of government or governmental restraint as the indispensable condition for full social and political liberty.
2. the methods or practices of anarchists.
[1635–45]

anarchism

1. a political theory advocating the elimination of governments and governmental restraint and the substitution of voluntary cooperation among individuals.
2. the methods and practices of anarchists. Cf. Nihilism.anarchist, n.anarchic, adj.
See also: Government

anarchism

The political theory that all governments oppress the people and should be abolished.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anarchism - a political theory favoring the abolition of governmentsanarchism - a political theory favoring the abolition of governments
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Translations
فَوْضَوِيه
anarchismus
anarkisme
anarchizmus
stjórnleysi
anarchizmus
anarşizm

anarchism

[ˈænəkɪzəm] Nanarquismo m

anarchism

[ˈænərkɪzəm] nanarchisme m

anarchism

nAnarchismus m

anarchism

[ˈænəˌkɪzm] n (Pol) → anarchismo

anarchy

(ˈӕnəki) noun
1. the absence or failure of government. Total anarchy followed the defeat of the government.
2. disorder and confusion.
ˈanarchist noun
1. a person who believes that governments are unnecessary or undesirable.
2. a person who tries to overturn the government by violence.
ˈanarchism noun
References in periodicals archive ?
(4.) Kirwin Shaffer, "Panama Red: Anarchist Politics and Transnational Networks in the Panama Canal Zone, 1904-1913," in de Laforcade and Shaffer, In Defiance of Boundaries, 49.
Of particular note is the work of Bob Torres (2007), who applies David Nibert's (2002) model of animal oppression to the case of highly industrialised capital-intensive agriculture in the global north, and in doing so, explicitly links it to anarchist politics. In addition, there is the important pamphlet by Brian Dominick (1995; 1996; 1997), Animal Liberation and Social Revolution, which outlined the similarities in perspective between anarchism and veganism, broadly defined in terms of living a life which is as compassionate as possible towards animals, including of course, human beings.
It is a set of tactics and practices that have developed since the early 20th century (and the rise of fascism in Italy) as a confrontational response to fascist groups, rooted in militant left-wing and anarchist politics."
Quadrio is not however rejecting the idea that 'religion' could play a role in political thought and anarchist politics, however he raises questions about invocating a 'determinate religion' as well as 'the specific values animating any religious perspective brought into an anarchist politics' (p.
Literary assessments that stem from either sort of account have thus looked past Vineland's specifically anarchist politics and the historical pressures to which the novel attributes those politics, imputing to the book political vagary and a lack of historical consciousness.
Eventually, the Youth Greens began to question this as well and most, such as the Minneapolis AWOL collective, dived deeper into anarchist politics. AWOL began working with local Native peoples against radioactive waste storage on a nearby reservation.
Abbey, also both novelist and essayist, inspired a generation of radical environmentalist groups with his anarchist politics, as described in the nonfiction Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness (1968) and the novel The Monkey Wrench Gang (1975).
Specific essays explore how "anarchist politics can counter the deadlocked drift toward passivity in the face of systemic violence and political antagonism," formulating an existential anthropology of violence, violence and the language of human rights, a Foucauldian analysis of "how power kills," and Kant's notion of the perpetual peace.
He did research in Siberia, wrote up his findings in a Moscow prison, and is remembered mostly for his contributions to anarchist politics. George Bernard Shaw described Kropotkin as "amiable to the point of saintliness," and in later life he was a ringer for Father Christmas.
Soon after he arrived in Paris' Gare de Lyon in 1886, the 21-year-old switched his first and last names and plunged into socialist and anarchist politics.
To summarize, York is an artful writer and each of his biographical chapters skillfully introduces faithful Christians who have practiced classical anarchist politics. These stories are available in more depth elsewhere, but these are good introductions.