anata

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anata

(ˈænətə) or

anatman

n
(Buddhism) (in Theravada Buddhism) the belief that since all things are constantly changing, there can be no such thing as a permanent, unchanging self: one of the three basic characteristics of existence. Sanskrit word: anatman Compare anicca, dukkha
[Pali, literally: no self]
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References in periodicals archive ?
(22) La doctrina de la superacion del yo individual, anatman, es uno de los fundamentos del budismo nativo indio.
By virtue of its emptiness, openness, throughness and no-being-in-itself (anatman), interality is inclusive, pervasive, and ubiquitous without presupposing what an absolute Being or Truth might be.
24-29) mark the intersection between Madhyamaka thought and the early Buddhist theory of no self (anatman), which is treated in the earlier part of Nagarjuna's chapter and in the commentaries.
Typical for it is the denial of the reality of the Self, the substance and soul (Anatman) and the establishment of the existence of instant units--or the so called dharmas--the last inseparable realities that exist from the onset.
Buddhist life writing tends to sharpen this focus on community and social relations at the expense of selfhood, reflecting the fact that Buddhism regards "no self" (in Sanskrit, anatman) as one of three marks or seals of existence, alongside impermanence (anitya) and suffering (duhkha).
Putting aside the question of what [virtue.sup.Buddha] and [mindfulness.sup.Buddha] consist of (see Chapter 6), [wisdom.sup.Buddha] involves an apprehension of anatman (no-self).
For instance, the Buddha sometimes refers to atman (a personal self), which is contrary to his teaching of anatman (the doctrine that there is no personal self).
El alma, por definicion, es una nocion estatica y fija, inmutable y permanente, la cual se opone a la esencia del budismo cuyos rasgos definitorios de la existencia humana son el anatman (la ausencia de alma), la anitya (la transitoriedad, el cambio constante, que es comun a todo lo existente) y el dukkha (el sufrimiento).
Truths, anatta (no-self) (Skt., anatman), and paticca-samuppdda
Key to such spiritual development in the Buddhist traditions is the doctrine of anatman or non-essentiality.
Rather it preached that the ideal spiritual state is one of anatman, or selflessness.
The decision to include King Gesar alerts readers both to a tradition of Buddhist nationalism and of the heroic Buddhist pursuit of "non-self" (anatman) which here overlaps with an egolessness that remains politically engaged.