anatto

(redirected from Anatta)
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a·nat·to

 (ə-nä′tō)
n.
Variant of annatto.

anatto

(əˈnætəʊ) or

anatta

n, pl -tos
(Plants) a variant spelling of annatto
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Anatta Nergui has been suspended from the medical register for a further nine months.
Enlightenment as the source of harmonious existence involves abandoning the concept of self altogether and realizing the no-self (anatta) principle as the state of emptiness after the removal of illusions about the self, which is at the same time the state of the fullness of potentialities.
Throughout his writings on multiple aspects of contemporary society, Loy has been consistent in applying what he calls "the psychotherapeutic interpretation of anatta" to the deluded sense of a collective self that promises to make us real.
Similarly, the notion of identity of non-identity (anatta)--namely that all things in the world are devoid of self- will be understood as a 'violation of the Aristotelian logic' (Park, ibid: p xiv).
Norman Stinchcombe Jazz Anatta Alex Merritt Quartet THE Birmingham Conservatoire-trained tenor saxophonist has Sam Lasserson on bass, John Turville on piano and Jeff Williams on drums.
A modest everyday kindness, rather than a pursuit to realise anatta, should be the immediate pursuit.
Butter is made more yellow by anatta. Jellies are coloured to simulate finer tones.
"Anatta's Dreams" is an inspired retelling of a Buddhist teaching loosely described as: Atisha Slogan #2: Regard all dharmas as dreams.
She writes, "Buddhism praises the idea of no-self (anatta), a realisation of dependent arising and emptiness, through which one can gain true freedom.
Anicca (Impermanance), Dukkha (Suffering) and Anatta (Non-self) were the spiritual guide lines our leaders have followed through centuries.
They subscribe to the Buddhist thought of impermanence (anicca), insubstantiality (anatta), illumination and enlightenment.
For Koyama, the Buddha's remedy in the Four Noble Truths that addresses dulkha (suffering), anicca (impermanence), and anatta (egolessness), the three marks of existence, implicitly left in place the image of a decaying world.