Anaxagoras


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An·ax·ag·o·ras

 (ăn′ăk-săg′ər-əs) 500?-428 bc.
Greek philosopher who held that objects are made up of infinitesimal parts, each of which contains a mixture of every different type of matter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Anaxagoras

(ˌænækˈsæɡərəs)
n
(Biography) ?500–428 bc, Greek philosopher who maintained that all things were composed of minute particles arranged by an eternal intelligence
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

An•ax•ag•o•ras

(ˌæn ækˈsæg ər əs)

n.
500?–428 B.C., Greek philosopher.
An`ax•ag`o•re′an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

An·ax·ag·o·ras

(ăn′ăk-săg′ər-əs)
500?-428 b.c. Greek philosopher and astronomer who was the first to explain eclipses correctly. He also stated that the sun and stars were glowing stones and that the moon took its light from the sun.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Anaxagoras - a presocratic Athenian philosopher who maintained that everything is composed of very small particles that were arranged by some eternal intelligence (500-428 BC)Anaxagoras - a presocratic Athenian philosopher who maintained that everything is composed of very small particles that were arranged by some eternal intelligence (500-428 BC)
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(Compare for Anaxagoras, Phaedo, Laws; for the Sophists, Meno, Republic, Tim., Theaet., Soph., etc.) But at the same time he shows that he is not one of them.
'Is that the way in which he is supposed to corrupt the youth?' 'Yes, it is.' 'Has he only new gods, or none at all?' 'None at all.' 'What, not even the sun and moon?' 'No; why, he says that the sun is a stone, and the moon earth.' That, replies Socrates, is the old confusion about Anaxagoras; the Athenian people are not so ignorant as to attribute to the influence of Socrates notions which have found their way into the drama, and may be learned at the theatre.
Towards Anaxagoras, who had disappointed him in his hopes of learning about mind and nature, he shows a less kindly feeling, which is also the feeling of Plato in other passages (Laws).
Anaxagoras said that he was in the world to admire the sun.
Here we catch a reminiscence both of the omoiomere, or similar particles of Anaxagoras, and of the world-animal of the Timaeus.
Phocion, Socrates, Anaxagoras, Diogenes, are great men, but they leave no class.
The baffled intellect must still kneel before this cause, which refuses to be named,-- ineffable cause, which every fine genius has essayed to represent by some emphatic symbol, as, Thales by water, Anaximenes by air, Anaxagoras by (Nous) thought, Zoroaster by fire, Jesus and the moderns by love; and the metaphor of each has become a national religion.
Anaxagoras: the development of an organism from a germ