Anaximenes


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Related to Anaximenes: Anaximander, Anaxagoras, Empedocles, Heraclitus

Anaximenes

(ˌænækˈsɪməˌniːz)
n
(Biography) 6th century bc, Greek philosopher who believed air to be the primary substance
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Noun1.Anaximenes - a presocratic Greek philosopher and associate of Anaximander who believed that all things are made of air in different degrees of density (6th century BC)
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The baffled intellect must still kneel before this cause, which refuses to be named,-- ineffable cause, which every fine genius has essayed to represent by some emphatic symbol, as, Thales by water, Anaximenes by air, Anaxagoras by (Nous) thought, Zoroaster by fire, Jesus and the moderns by love; and the metaphor of each has become a national religion.
Philosophy, in the person of the first Greek natural philosophers (Thales, Anaximander, Anaximenes, Heraclitus, etc.) arises as the first practice in the history of mankind of reflecting the diversity enclosed in the world around them, in the form of primary abstractions, concepts and categories.
Quiza los padres de la filosofia, Tales y Anaximenes, tenian en mente algo similar, dado que, aplicando el criterio del salto, al intentar justificar el argumento del origen, respectivamente, por el agua o por el aire, en cierto sentido podian decir (simplemente): "mira".
(14) Pneuma has continually been thought along with one of Whitman's most prominently invoked addressees, the soul, ever since Anaximenes's famous equation "Just as our soul [[phrase omitted]],...
Between Anaximenes and Isocrates, then, we might derive a reasonably full picture of a sophistic, non-Aristotelian notion of the enthymeme that is pervasive in the Hellenistic rhetorical tradition: the enthymeme is a strategic, kairotic, argumentational turn that exploits a cluster of emotively charged, value-laden oppositions made available (usually) by an exetastic buildup, in order to generate in its audience a passional identification with or adherence to a particular stance, and that (ideally) will strike the audience as an "abrupt" and decisive flash of insight.
Por su parte, Jenocrates distingue los [phrase omitted] (Tales, Anaximandro, Anaximenes, Heraclito y Democrito) de los que proponen numeros incorporeos, como los Pitagoricos, incluso Platon (Xenocr.
Anaximenes Leon Granadillo, Medico Gineco-obstetra de extraordinarios dotes, Profesor ordinario de esta Facultad; y la eponima Dra.
Thus far in this essay I have revisited many of the primordial, mytho-poetic first accounts of, and preliminary rival hypotheses concerning, experience in the raw and its underlying principle(s): flux and becoming (the flux-gibberish of Heraclitus that William Desmond discusses in his contribution to this special issue); undifferentiated being and the decided absence of nonbeing (Parmenides); a material mixture of some sort with opposite forces as agents of mixing (the love and strife of Empedocles); or initially with the Ionians, one above others of the materials mixed: water (Thales), air or vapor and a principle of condensation and rarefaction (Anaximenes), nous or Mind (Anaxagoras), the "Logos in the lightening" (as Phillip Wheelright characterized Heraclitus).