Brython

(redirected from Ancient Britons)

Bryth·on

 (brĭth′ən, -ŏn′)
n.
1. An ancient Celtic Briton. No longer in scholarly use.
2. A member of a Brittonic-speaking people. No longer in scholarly use.

[Welsh, from Latin Brittonēs, Britons; see Briton.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Brython

(ˈbrɪθən)
n
(Peoples) a Celt who speaks a Brythonic language. Compare Goidel
[C19: from Welsh; see Briton]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
These may have been the ancient Britons whom Caesar fought when he first came to our shore.
I had not then seen a coracle, such as the ancient Britons made, but I have seen one since, and I can give you no fairer idea of Ben Gunn's boat than by saying it was like the first and the worst coracle ever made by man.
On the other hand, if you showed an Ancient Briton a revolver, I doubt if he would know it was a weapon-- until it was fired into him, of course.
If a man like your brother likes to go into Parliament as a yeoman or a gentleman or a Jacobite or an Ancient Briton, I should say it would be a jolly good thing."
Ancient Britons revered yew trees, perhaps because they lived to a grand old age.
Which plant was cultivated by the ancient Britons as a source of blue dye?
Some villagers said the mysterious mound marked the burial place of ancient Britons, Picts, Scots and Vikings slain in bloody battle more than 1,000 years ago.
ANCIENT Britons travelled for hundreds of miles for rave-like mass gatherings around Stonehenge, a study suggests.
ANCIENT Britons travelled for hundreds of miles for ravelike mass gatherings around Stonehenge, a study suggests.
It was traversed by the Romans and probably ancient Britons before them.
The fort, once occupied by ancient Britons, dates from around 500AD.

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